This day in baseball: Double fest

On July 21, 1921, the Yankees and the Indians hit a collective total of 21 doubles, establishing an American League record.  Cleveland collected nine of the two-baggers, defeating New York 17-8 at League Park.

League Park Cleveland

Wikipedia


6-year-old Coach Drake loses it after ejection

A friend of mine sent me this video by the Kalamazoo Growlers, and it had me laughing so hard that I just had to share the love.  There is, of course, a whole heap of social commentary to be made about how this video represents the sorts of examples we are setting for our kids.  In terms of pure entertainment, meanwhile, it does provide a couple minutes of comic relief.


Quote of the day

One percent of ballplayers are leaders of men. The other ninety-nine percent are followers of women.

~John McGraw

JohnMcGraw1919

Wikipedia


MLB Logos Through the Years

This video popped up on my YouTube feed yesterday.  (Thanks, YouTube, for stalking my viewing history to offer up this suggestion…)  While the video is a tad lengthy, it’s also quite fascinating.  It provides a history of logos of MLB teams, and even takes into account location and team name changes — for example, how the 1960s Washington Senators became the Texas Rangers, or how the Brooklyn Superbas eventually evolved into the present-day Los Angeles Dodgers.

Some of these logos I don’t think I’ve ever seen before.  Others I did remember, and they made me feel a bit nostalgic.  Sports evolution, every aspect of it, is an interesting phenomenon.


Infographic: Baseball salaries, 1988-2017

Here’s an interesting graphic from Business Insider showing the growing disparity in salaries between Major League Baseball’s highest paid players and the average player salary.  The average salary essentially doubled from 1988 to 2017, but that’s nothing compared to the drastic increase in the highest salaries.

baseball salaries


This day in baseball: Anson reaches 3,000

On July 16, 1897, Chicago Colts first baseman Cap Anson became the first player in major league history to collect 3,000 hits when he singled off Baltimore pitcher George Blackburn.  Anson was forty-five years old when he reached the milestone as Chicago lost to Baltimore, 2-1.

These days, some controversy remains as to whether or not Anson should be considered the first player to reach this milestone.  This hit total disregarded a rule in place for the 1887 season that counted bases-on-balls as hits.  Anson had collected 60 walks during the 1887 season.

cap anson

Cap Anson (Wikipedia)


Quote of the day

If God wanted football played in the spring, he would not have invented baseball.

~Sam Rutigliano

Sam-Rutigliano

Wikipedia