Infographic: The Cost of A Season Without Spectators

The infographic below was created by Statista back in March, estimating the potential losses MLB teams would be facing if they were to play an 82-game season in front of no live fans.  For an 82-game season, each team in the league would be facing an average loss of $640,000 per game.  The infographic shows estimated total losses for the top eight teams as a result of the shortened season and spectator-less games.  The total loss for the MLB was estimated to come in around $4 billion.

infographic covid ghost games.jpg

Fast forward to the current arrangement, with a 60-game season, and these dollar amounts are no doubt looking even more ominous than the ones in the graphic.  As much as we all hate that money is such a big part of professional sports, it’s no wonder there was so much of a push to get a season, any season, underway to recoup some of these losses.

However, as I’ve mentioned before, with the coronavirus continuing to spread around the country at such a rapid rate, it’ll be interesting to see if the league even makes it all the way through the planned 60-game schedule.


Happy Independence Day!

To all my readers in the States, please have a safe holiday.  Wear your masks, wash your hands, keep social distancing, and if you’re going to use fireworks, please be mindful of others when doing so.


The 2020 season guide

Major League Baseball just posted this handy quick-reference guide on social media.   While I’m not a huge fan of the runner-on-second rule for extra inning games, I’m pretty excited to see what the universal DH will bring this year.

Further details can be found on this FAQ posted on MLB.com.

2020 MLB guide


Baseball is coming back

Players, owners, teams, the league… all the moving parts of the MLB universe have finally come together, and we are, at last, going to see some baseball for the 2020 season!

Major League Baseball is having a second Spring Training (or should we call it “Summer Training” at this point?) to begin in about a week’s time, on July 1st.  Then, we will be looking at a 60-game regular season, to be played over the course of about 66 days, from about July 23rd or 24th until September 27th.  The postseason will begin on September 29th, with the World Series to begin on October 20th, and a potential Game 7 to be played on October 28th.

With the COVID-19 pandemic still in full swing, access to games is going to be limited, of course.  No fans in the stands is going to seem a bit weird, but so long as we can watch games from the comfort of our living rooms, that seems like a minor concession at this point.  There will be a regimen of temperature checks and symptom checks, as well routine tests for the virus, not just among players, but also coaches, trainers, staff, etc.  Players who are high-risk or who have family members at high risk have the option to opt out for the season and still get paid.  Media interactions with the teams, meanwhile, will all take place through Zoom, in order to adhere to social distancing recommendations.

On the field, spitting will be banned, which makes perfect sense given the nature of how the virus spreads.  Non-playing players in the dugout will be required to wear masks.  Pitchers will bring their own rosin bags and will even be permitted to carry a wet rag in their back pocket so they won’t need to lick their fingers (does anyone else sniff a potential for some doctoring on this one?).  Social distancing, in general, remains strongly encouraged.

How well will this all work?  Obviously, it’s difficult to tell until things really get underway.  The potential for a widespread outbreak remains very real — just look at what happened among the Phillies last week — and for all we know, the season might end abruptly after the first thirty days.

Information about this new development is still coming, even as I write this.  This strange, strange season just keeps getting stranger, and while I’m happy that we’re going to see some ballgames, half of me is intensely curious about how long it’s really going to last.

See the source image


“Ode to the Mets,” The Strokes

I was a big fan of The Strokes through my time in college and grad school, but I haven’t paid much attention to them in recent years.  So my thanks goes out to Jackie, a.k.a. The Baseball Bloggess, for sharing this gem with me!

The lyrics of this song look back at the band’s career and their history in New York City, where they grew up together. The title of the song, of course, references the New York Mets, whom lead singer Julian Casablancas calls the team of his youth. Casablancas wrote the song after the Mets lost Game 7 of the 2016 NL Wild Card to the San Francisco Giants — a loss that exacerbated the frustrations of fans of a team that has not won a World Series since 1986. The band views the name as symbolic, with the Mets representing something that you set your heart on, but that continues to disappoint.


Happy Memorial Day

A sincere thank you to all who serve!


Chipper Jones’s Hall of Fame induction speech

I really like Chipper Jones’s opening comment to his speech: I can only imagine how nerve wracking it would be to stand up there and talk in front of so many people on such an important occasion.  And the Jim Thome story is absolutely hilarious.  Jones was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.


Infographic: The Cost of Being a Baseball Fan

This infographic by PlayNJ appears to have been made fairly recently — just last month, if I’m not mistaken.  As we all know, attending an MLB game is not a cheap outing, and this graphic takes a look at what that cost amounts to if a fan goes throughout the year.  According to the fine print on the graphic, these annual costs include the price of one team cap and one team jersey, plus ticket, parking, one beer, one soft drink, and one hot dog per game for 81 home games.

Cost of Being a Baseball Fan infographic


“Thome at the Plate,” The Whipkey Three

When Jim Thome arrived in Minnesota in 2010, Twins fans were understandably excited.  One fan, Matt Whipkey from Omaha, Nebraska, was so thrilled to have Thome on the team, he decided to write a rock tribute for the slugger.  Unfortunately for Twins fans, Thome’s stint with the team didn’t last terribly long, though he at least gave them a reason to cheer while his time there lasted.


Sparky Anderson’s Hall of Fame induction speech

This might be my favorite Hall of Fame induction speech that I have listened to thus far.  Sparky Anderson speaks with an energy and an attitude that makes me smile.  I particularly like how he pronounces “Cincinnati.”  Sparky Anderson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000.