This day in baseball: Ruth moves to second

On June 20, 1921, Babe Ruth hit his 127th career home run, moving him past Sam Thompson into second place all time for career homers and 11 homers behind all-time leader Roger Connor.  His blast helped the Yankees on their way to a 7-6 win over the Red Sox in ten innings.

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Baltimore Sun


“7th Game : 1960 Series,” by Paul Blackburn

 

paul blackburn

Paul Blackburn (Wikipedia)

This piece by Paul Blackburn provides an abridged look at Game 7 of the 1960 World Series between the New York Yankees and the Pittsburgh Pirates.  Living in New York, he describes the experience of Yankees fans, and there is something almost mystical about the City That Never Sleeps quieting down for a baseball game.  I imagine that silence must have continued for a few days after that blast by Bill Mazeroski, the only winner-take-all walk-off home run in World Series history.

 

*

Nice day,
sweet October afternoon
Men walk the sun-shot avenues,
                          Second, Third, eyes
                          intent elsewhere
ears communing with transistors in shirt pockets
                 Bars are full, quiet,
discussion during commercials
                            only
Pirates lead New York 4-1, top of the 6th, 2
Yankees on base,   1 man out
What a nice day for all this  !
Handsome women, even
dreamy jailbait, walk
                     nearly neglected :
men’s eyes are blank
their thoughts are all in Pittsburgh
Last half of the 9th, the score tied 9-all,
Mazeroski leads off for the Pirates
The 2nd pitch he simply, sweetly
                                CRACK!
belts it clean over the left-field wall
Blocks of afternoon
acres of afternoon
Pennsylvania Turnpikes of afternoon . One
                  diamond stretches out in the sun
                          the 3rd base line
                  and what men come down
                  it
                  The final score, 10-9
Yanquis, come home

Happy Father’s Day

Happy Father’s Day to all the baseball dads!  The fathers of ballplayers, the grandfathers of players, and the ballplayers who are fathers.

fathers-day-cupcakes-baseball


Quote of the day

You can’t think and hit at the same time.

~Yogi Berra

berra

Bronx Banter Blog


This day in baseball: The A’s make a comeback

In a game against the Indians on June 15, 1925, the Philadelphia A’s found themselves trailing 15-4 going into the bottom of the eighth inning.  That inning, the Athletics posted an astonishing 13 runs to take the lead.  They held onto that lead in the top of the ninth and won the game, 17-15.

Full box score can be found here.

indians - a's


A long overdue baseball joke

This week seems off to a decent start, so here’s one to keep up the good mood.

~

The Cleveland Symphony Orchestra was rehearsing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. There is an extensive section where the bass players don’t play for twenty minutes of so. One of them decided that, rather than stand around on stage looking bored and stupid, they’d all just file offstage during their tacit-time and hang out backstage, then return when they were about to play. It seemed like a good idea at the time.

On the night of the performance, the bass players filed off as planned. The last one had barely left the stage when the leader suggested, “Hey we’ve got twenty minutes, let’s run across the street to the bar for a few!”

This idea was met with great approval, so off they went, tuxedos and all, to loosen up. Fifteen minutes and a few rounds later, one of the bass players said, “Shouldn’t we be heading back? It’s almost time.”

But the leader announced, “Oh don’t worry, we’ll have some extra time – I played a little joke on the conductor. Before the performance started, I tied string around each page of his score so that he’d have to untie each page to turn it. The piece will drag on a bit. We’ve got time for another round!”

So another round they did, and finally – sloshed and staggering – they made their way back across the street to finish Ludwig’s 9th.

Upon entering the stage, they immediately noticed the conductor’s haggard, drawn and livid expression.

“Gee,” one player queried, “Why do you suppose he looks so tense?”

“You’d be tense, too,” laughed the leader. “It’s the bottom of the ninth, the score is tied and the basses are loaded.”


Quote of the day

Two hours is about as long as any American can wait for the close of a baseball game, or anything else for that matter.

~Al Spalding

 

Spalding

businesshistory.com