‘Baseball, Boys, and Bad Words,’ by Andy Andrews

I came across this book while browsing the library yesterday.  Baseball, Boys, and Bad Words is a small book, and I found the title intriguing, so I decided to go ahead and check it out.  It would be a nice, fast, easy read, and it was about baseball.andrews

The story takes place in 1970, when the author, Andy Andrews, was eleven years old.  He and his friends were returning for another season of Little League baseball.  This year, they were getting a new coach who was “new to the area.”  The new coach’s manner of speech at first confuses the boys, but then leads to some amusing moments throughout their season.  We hear about themes familiar to anyone who’s ever played Little League: the worst player is in right field, the coach’s son is automatically the pitcher, etc.

It’s a very short story, so I don’t think I can say much more about it without giving the whole thing away.  If it were typed in a straight text format, I can’t imagine this tale would take up more than a couple of pages.  Obviously the text is broken up to allow for conversion into book format.  Besides the story itself, the book is littered with a variety of pictures and baseball-related quotes, which, if you’re a regular reader of this blog, you would know is something I enjoy.

Though I enjoyed the story (I literally laughed out loud a couple times) as well as the quotes and the photography, if you are curious about this book, I would encourage you to look for it at the library.  It might make for a fun gift for a young ballplayer’s birthday, but outside of that, I honestly can’t say it’s worth the money you’d spend on it.  It might have been better published in a magazine or other periodical, to be read and enjoyed once, but not something truly worth taking up space on your bookshelves.


This day in baseball: A trade of two Babes

The Phillies traded first baseman Babe Dahlgren to the Pirates on December 30, 1943 in exchange for catcher Babe Phelps and cash. Ellsworth Tenney “Babe” Dahlgren would be best remembered in baseball history as the man who replaced Lou Gehrig in the lineup on May 2, 1939, at the end of Gehrig’s fourteen-year, 2,130 consecutive game streak.

 

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Amazon

 


“Progeny,” by John Lambremont, Sr.

Here’s a piece by John Lambremont, Sr. published by Spitball Magazine in February 2010. I enjoy pieces like this one where baseball metaphors aren’t necessarily overt, but they’re definitely there.

*

Age-old Southern faces,
tight-lipped and grim,
in their batting helmets,
their chins tucked in,
raise their steel barrels
and dig in again.

Remnants of their ancestry,
descendants of their kin,
that stared down steel barrels
and charged again,
knowing that their chances
to survive were slim.

The batteries of the enemy
are usually going to win.


Quote of the day

Never permit the pressure to exceed the pleasure.

~Joe Maddon

Joe-Maddon

chicagobusiness.com


Baseball 101: Baseball Basics

I have a handful of friends whom I’ve converted into baseball fans just by talking about the game.  Fortunately for me, they all already had some familiarity with how the game works, so it was really just a matter of conveying my excitement.  However, I know there are some folks out there who are completely unfamiliar with baseball, and I was pretty happy to come across this video.  I’ll have to keep it in my back pocket for the day I meet someone who might be interested, but doesn’t know anything about this wonderful pastime.


Continuing the countdown

48 days remaining until pitchers and catchers report!

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Happy Holidays!

Wishing everyone a restful and fun-filled holiday season.

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