This day in baseball: The modern Orioles are born

On November 17, 1953, the St. Louis Browns officially became the Baltimore Baseball Club, Inc., changing the team’s name to the Orioles.  After 52 years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests headed by Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D’Alesandro, Jr.

Orioles_Mascot

Wikipedia

 


“Cubs in Five,” The Mountain Goats

The Chicago Cubs went so long between World Series championships that, even after finally winning one, the pop culture references to their dry spell continue to haunt.  This song is an example of just that.  You know you’ve had a rough time of things when the likelihood of your winning again gets compared to the likelihood of the Canterbury Tales becoming a bestseller.


Quote of the day

There is an old saying that money can’t buy happiness. If it could, I would buy myself four hits every game.

~Pete Rose

rose book


Mustard

This one makes me wish I was at the ballpark with a hot dog and beer in hand.

baseball comic hot dog

Steve Moore


This day in baseball: Kenesaw Mountain Landis is hired

U.S. District Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis accepted the offer to become baseball’s first commissioner on November 12, 1920.  The decision to hire a commissioner came in the wake of the 1919 World Series scandal, which involved eight White Sox players who were paid off by gamblers to throw the Series against Cincinnati.  Landis would officially begin his new role in January 1921.

Landis_portrait-restored


Baseball at the Met

Yesterday I happened across a tidbit stating that one of the largest baseball card collections resides at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  I’ve never been a card collector, so I suppose this might already be common knowledge and I’ve just been out of the loop.  I did want to check it out all the same, so I poked around and discovered that the Met is in the process of cataloging the cards, all part of the Jefferson R. Burdick collection, online.  You can find the collection here.

Just minutes of exploring has revealed some gems, such as this collection of cartooned baseball stars from 1943:

Burdick 324(2)

Metropolitan Museum of Art

And these old school pennants from 1933.

1933 baseball pennants.PNG

Metropolitan Museum of Art

And there are, of course, a myriad of traditional baseball cards:

Jimmy Foxx 1935 baseball card

Metropolitan Museum of Art

I have to say, this is my type of card collection.  A variety of cards, and yet virtual so that they don’t actually take up a bunch of physical space.  Happy exploring!


Quote of the day

I’ve fallen in love with baseball.

~Nick Jonas

Nick Jonas baseball

fanpop