This day in baseball: Clarke’s debut

Future Hall of Famer Fred Clarke made his major league debut on June 30, 1894.  Clarke went five-for-five for the Louisville Colonels, collecting four singles and a triple.

Fred_Clarke 1903

Fred Clarke in 1903 (Library of Congress)


Nokona baseball gloves

This little documentary is less than seven minutes long, and it is a fun watch.  Not only do you learn some things about Nokona baseball gloves, you get to watch the process of a ball glove getting made.  And I love the fact that the work shirts worn by Nokona employees are baseball jerseys.


Quote of the day

You can have money piled to the ceiling but the size of your funeral is still going to depend on the weather.

~Chuck Tanner

Chuck Tanner

ESPN.com


Switching sports

Today we rejoin our hero Calvin as he realizes that perhaps his struggles with baseball lie in that he might be trying his hand at the wrong sport.

calvin and hobbes baseball golf

Bill Watterson


This day in baseball: Yde’s offensive show

On June 25, 1924, left-handed relief pitcher Emil Yde hit a double in the ninth inning to tie the score, 6-6, against the Cubs and send the game into extra innings.  Then, in the fourteenth inning, Yde hit a triple to lead the Pirates to an 8-7 victory.

Emil Yde

Emil Yde (Baseball Reference)


Quote of the day

Somebody once asked me if I ever went up to the plate trying to hit a home run. I said, ‘Sure, every time.’

~Mickey Mantle

200px-Mickey_Mantle_1953

Wikimedia Commons


“Glory,” by Yusef Komunyakaa

This piece by Yusef Komunyakaa was published originally in Magic City in 1992.  It serves as a nod to black baseball as well as a depiction of baseball as play in juxtaposition to the working lives of black Americans.  Life is hard for these young men, but the game provides them with an outlet to help them get through it all.

*

Most were married teenagers
Working knockout shifts daybreak
To sunset six days a week–
Already old men playing ball
In a field between a row of shotgun houses
& the Magazine Lumber Company.
They were all Jackie Robinson
& Willie Mays, a touch of
Josh Gibson & Satchell Paige
In each stance and swing, a promise
Like a hesitation pitch always
At the edge of their lives,
Arms sharp as rifles.
The Sunday afternoon heat
Flared like thin flowered skirts
As children and wives cheered.
The men were like cats
Running backwards to snag
Pop-ups & high-flies off
Fences, stealing each others’s glory.
The old deacons & raconteurs
Who umpired made an Out or Safe
Into a song & dance routine.
Runners hit the dirt
& slid into homeplate,
Cleats catching light,
As they conjured escapes, outfoxing
Double plays. In the few seconds
It took a man to eye a woman
Upon the makeshift bleachers,
A stolen base or homerun
Would help another man
Survive the new week.