Infographic: Beef, Lamb, and Baseball

Here are some interesting numbers from the Public Lands Council, an organization that advocates for western ranchers.  This infographic was posted on the Idaho Wool Growers Association’s Facebook page in November 2019.  I did the math on the number hot dogs served, and if we assume that a hot dog weighs 76 grams, that equals over 3 million pounds of hot dogs per MLB season — and that doesn’t even include the bun and condiments!

These numbers definitely made me think back to this comic I posted back in December.  Holy smokes, that’s a lot of animal products in our national pastime.

Beef Lamb Baseball infographic.png


“Mrs. Robinson,” by Simon & Garfunkel

I am honestly surprised that I haven’t posted this classic tune yet.  Apparently, Joe DiMaggio was actually annoyed by the inclusion of his name in this song, until Paul Simon explained the meaning to him.

“I happened to be in a restaurant and there he was,” recalls Simon in the interview. “I gathered up my nerve to go over and introduce myself and say, ‘Hi, I’m the guy that wrote “Mrs. Robinson,” ’ and he said ‘Yeah, sit down . . . why’d you say that? I’m here, everyone knows I’m here.’ I said, ‘I don’t mean it that way — I mean, where are these great heroes now?’ He was flattered once he understood that it was meant to be flattering.”


This day in baseball: Connor’s switch-hit debut

Though he had been hitting as a lefty throughout his career, on August 7, 1893, New York Giants first baseman Roger Connor stepped up to the plate right-handed for the first time against a left-handed Brooklyn Bridegrooms pitcher.  The right side of the plate turned out to be lucky for Connor that day, as he belted two homers and a single en route to a 10-3 win.

I did a small bit of poking around regarding Connor’s switch-hitting, and while specific details seem hard to find, I notice that some sites have him listed as a left-handed hitter while others list him as a switch-hitter.  A case can be made either way, it seems.

Roger Connor SABR.jpg

Roger Connor (sabr.org)


Quote of the day

One reason I have always loved baseball so much is that it has been not merely “the great national game” but really a part of the whole weather of our lives, of the thing that is our own, of the whole fabric, the million memories of America.

~Thomas Wolfe

Thomas_Wolfe_1937 wikipedia.jpg

Wolfe in 1937 (Library of Congress)


Role playing for a self-esteem boost

After all, what are dads for?

If only I could get this to work on the field for my teams.

Family circus baseball.jpg


This day in baseball: Yellow baseballs

For the first game of a doubleheader played on August 2, 1938, Larry MacPhail had official baseballs dyed dandelion yellow, and the balls were used in the matchup between the Dodgers and Cardinals at Ebbets Field.  The inspiration for this yellow ball came from a New York color engineer named Frederic H. Rahr, who developed it after Mickey Cochrane was severely beaned at the plate the previous year.

“My primary object is to give the hitter more safety and there’s no question that this will be achieved,” said Rahr. “That’s simply because the batter will be striking at a ball he can see instead of at a white object that blurs with the background.”

The Dodgers won that opening game with the yellow baseballs by a score of 6-2.  The Dodgers went on to use up their yellow balls in three more games in 1939, but the yellow balls would not get used again after that season.

1938 Yellow Baseball.jpg

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum


What’s your walk-up song?

This past week, a co-worker shared this episode by Kansas Public Radio with me.  To celebrate the return of Major League Baseball, KPR asked members of its own staff to share what song they’d pick as their own personal walk-up song.  I listened to the episode while doing some housework the other night (can I just mention what a privilege it is to be able to listen to cool stuff while doing chores?), and it was fascinating to hear what these individuals each chose as their tunes.  One guy chose the Bagel Bites jingle from the 1990s commercial, which I found most amusing of the choices.  Each staffer explains why they selected their song, and the program even goes on to play each song.  If that sort of thing interests you, I encourage you to give the episode a listen, as well.

Of course, this also got me thinking about what I would choose as my own walk-up song, and I have to confess, I’m finding it hard to choose.  I do feel like Smash Mouth’s “All Star” is pretty hard to beat, but I imagine it would also be an overused selection:


But then, the chorus of Papa Roach’s “Face Everything and Rise” provides quite the pump up without being quite as mainstream:

Or if you’d rather get away from lyrics, at the moment I’d probably go with one of the instrumental portions of Code Black’s “Tonight Will Never Die”:


To be honest, I could probably go on and on for days listing possible songs, so for the sake of brevity, we’ll stop this list at three.  And honestly, if I were to do this again tomorrow, my top three would likely be completely different.  I’ve decided that the most logical solution to this problem, in the unlikely event that I ever do become a big league ballplayer, is that I’ll just have to make a point to bribe the PA team to play a different song with each at-bat.  That’s reasonable, isn’t it?

But now, I’m curious: what tune would you choose as your walk-up song?