Foghorn Leghorn Teaching the Art of Baseball

I have a vague memory of seeing this clip in the midst of my Saturday morning cartoon experience growing up.  I love the implied conflict of brains versus brawn in this and some of the literal translations of phrases one might hear on a ball field.


This day in baseball: Ruth vs. Johnson vs. extra innings

At Fenway Park on August 15, 1916, Red Sox pitcher Babe Ruth came out victorious over Walter Johnson and the Senators, 1-0 in 13 innings.  Though Johnson managed to keep Boston to four hits over the first twelve innings, he gave up three more hits in the 13th, thus allowing Jack Barry to score the game’s lone run.

Babe Ruth and Walter Johnson

Walter Johnson and Babe Ruth (mlb.com)


Quote of the day

The great thing about baseball is there’s a crisis every day.

~Gabe Paul

Gabe_Paul

Wikipedia


One with the bat

I never really could understand the idea of becoming “one with the bat.”  Wouldn’t that hurt?

duplex comic

gocomics.com


This day in baseball: High-hit shutout

In the second game of a doubleheader on August 12, 1921, the Phillies’ right-handed pitcher George Smith gave up 12 hits, and yet he still managed to pitch a shutout against the Boston Braves, winning 4-0.  Smith had also started the first game of the doubleheader, but in that game, he gave up three runs on four hits and was taken out in the second inning.

george smith

Baseball Reference


“The Baseball Card Song,” by The Baseball Project

Here’s another great song by The Baseball Project.  I owned a few baseball cards as a kid, but not enough to really call it a collection — my parents would have viewed such a compilation as superfluous and wasteful.  As an adult, I’m glad this was the case as the cards would probably have just been boxed away or thrown away when I left for school, but I can certainly appreciate the idea of a card collection.


Quote of the day

When you’re in the day-to-day grind, it just seems like it’s another step along the way. But I find joy in the actual process, the journey, the work. It’s not the end event.

~Cal Ripken, Jr.

Cal_Ripken,_Jr_in_1996

“Cal Ripken, Jr in 1996” by Joe Shlabotnik