This day in baseball: Baker Bowl

The first game at Philadelphia’s Baker Bowl was played on April 30, 1887. The ballpark was constructed by Phillies owners AJ Reach and John Rogers, costing about $80,000. With a capacity of about 12,500, the new field was considered state-of-the-art. In the stadium’s inaugural game, the Phillies beat the Giants, 19-10.

 

Baker_Bowl

Wikimedia Commons

 


Anime baseball

This short film by Corridor Digital takes our National Pastime a represents it with an Anime twist.  The driving idea behind this video (and, it appears, a few others that they’ve done) is: What happens when you take something normal and turn it into anime?

As a heads up, the plot, the dialogue, and the internal monologues throughout this clip are extremely cheesy, but then again, that’s half the fun.  I’m generally pretty indifferent to anime, but I must confess, I found this little spiel quite entertaining.


Davidson at the K

I wake up this morning, and one of the first things I see on Twitter is this:

Quite the accomplishment for Matt Davidson, for sure, especially when you consider that Kauffman Stadium is not the most home run-friendly ballpark in the league.

As a Royals fan, however, this is the kind of statistic one dreads to see making headlines.

Davidson has had three multi-home run games already this season, and all three of those games took place — you guessed it — at Kauffman Stadium.  And since the Royals and the White Sox are division rivals, Davidson will have six more games at the K (including today’s doubleheader) to add to his record.

Royals fans already knew this would be a long season.  Now we’re just throwing salt on the wound.

Kansas_City_Kaufmann_Stadium


Quote of the day

Baseball is the belly-button of our society. Straighten out baseball, and you straighten out the rest of the world.

~Bill Lee

Bill-Lee-Space

Getty Images


Pitching signs

Everybody’s watching.  It’s a good thing baseball employs super secret signal systems to ensure that important messages get out to everyone on the field.

 

Baseball Signals 2

John McPherson

 


This day in baseball: White Stockings’ NL debut

The Chicago White Stockings, in their fifth season as a franchise, made their National League debut on April 25, 1876, winning 4-0 over the Grays at the Louisville Baseball Park in Kentucky. The White Stockings won the NL’s first championship during this season with a record of 52–14. The franchise would be also known as the Colts and the Orphans before becoming the Cubs in 1903.

1876_Chicago_White_Stockings

Wikimedia Commons


Infographic: Feats of Opening Day

This graphic by ESPN is from 2013, but still pretty interesting.  Opening Day feats never fail to capture the attention of baseball fans.

opening day


Quote of the day

I never blame myself when I’m not hitting. I just blame the bat and if it keeps up, I change bats.

~Yogi Berra

yogi


This day in baseball: Bucs debut at Exposition Park

The Pittsburgh Pirates made their debut at Exposition Park in Pittsburg on April 22, 1891, losing to the Cubs, 7-6.  Exposition Park had opened the previous year as the home of the Pittsburgh Burghers of the short-lived Players’ League.  The Bucs would call Exposition Park home until 1909, when they moved to Forbes Field.

ExpositionParkin1905

Exposition Park, 1905 (Wikimedia Commons)


“The Man Into Whose Yard You Should Not Hit Your Ball,” by Thomas Lux

I have known folks who mow their lawn this way.  Pine cones?  Run ’em over.  Thick coatings of leaves?  The mower can handle it.  Rocks?  Who cares if they go flying?

I don’t mow that way 1) because I don’t have the money to buy a new lawn mower every other month, and 2) because I learned in a most unfortunate manner what happens when the mower picks up a stray rock and sends it flying into a window.

Running over a baseball would surely wreak havoc on any mower, no manner how sturdy and well-built it may be.  And any mower would wreak just as much havoc on the poor baseball.

*

each day mowed
and mowed his lawn, his dry quarter acre,
the machine slicing a wisp
from each blade’s tip.
Dust storms rose
around the roar: 6:00 P.
M.
, every day,
spring, summer, fall.
If he could mow
the snow he would.

On one side, his neighbors the cows
turned their backs to him
and did what they do to the grass.

Where he worked, I don’t know
but it sets his jaw to: tight.

His wife a cipher, shoebox tissue,
a shattered apron.
As if
into her head he drove a wedge of shale.

Years later his daughter goes to jail.

Mow, mow, mow his lawn
gently down a decade’s summers.

On his other side lived mine and me,
across a narrow pasture, often fallow;
a field of fly balls, the best part of childhood
and baseball, but one could not cross his line
and if it did,
as one did in 1956
and another in 1958,
it came back coleslaw — his lawn mower
ate it up, happy
to cut something, no matter
what the manual said
about foreign objects,
stones, or sticks.