This day in baseball: Pittsburgh’s NL debut

The Pittsburgh Alleghenys, now known as the Pirates, played their first game in the National League on April 30, 1887, defeating the defending league-champion Chicago White Stockings, 6-2, at Pittsburgh’s Recreation Park. Formerly an American Association team the Alleghenys posted a 55-69 record in their first season, finishing in 6th place in the eight-team circuit.

1888_Pittsburg_Alleghenys

1888 Alleghenys


Quote of the day

A good professional athlete must have the love of a little boy. And the good players feel the kind of love for the game that they did when they were Little Leaguers.

~Tom Seaver

Tom_Seaver_at_Shea_Stadium_1974_CROP

Wikimedia Commons


Poem on Lou Gehrig’s trophy

gehrig

The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter

Shortly following Lou Gehrig’s retirement from baseball, due to his diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the Yankees declared July 4, 1939 “Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day.”  On this day, Gehrig delivered his now-historic “Luckiest Man” speech to the fans of Yankee Stadium.  During that ceremony, Gehrig’s teammates presented him with a trophy, and on that trophy they had the following poem, written by John Kiernan, engraved.

*

To LOU GEHRIG

We’ve been to the wars together;
We took our foes as they came;
And always you were the leader,
And ever you played the game.
Idol of cheering millions,
Records are yours by sheaves;
Iron of frame they hailed you
Decked you with laurel leaves.
But higher than that we hold you,
We who have known you best;
Knowing the way you came through
Every human test.
Let this be a silent token
Of lasting Friendship’s gleam,
And all that we’ve left unspoken;
Your Pals of the Yankees Team.


From baseball bats to chopsticks

I love this video.  The environmentalist in me has always felt guilty about supporting a game that uses up so many trees.  I’m glad to see that there are folks like Mr. Uratani who have found a way to further make further use of all those broken bats.


This day in baseball: Gehrig loses a home run

On April 26, 1931, with Lyn Lary as the runner on first base and two out in the inning, Yankee first baseman Lou Gehrig hit a home run at Griffith Stadium.  The homer cleared the centerfield fence, but then bounced back into the hands of Senators centerfielder Harry Rice.  Lary, thinking the ball had been caught, returned to the dugout without ever crossing home plate.  Gehrig, who had been running the bases with his head down, did not notice what happened and ended up getting called out for passing a runner on the base paths.

The incident ended up costing Gehrig the home run crown, as he and Babe Ruth finished the season tied with 46 homers a piece.

lou_gehrig


Quote of the day

No matter what I talk about, I always get back to baseball.

~Connie Mack

connie mack

National Baseball Hall of Fame Library/Major League Baseball/Getty Images


Hit one for me

I came across this comic on Twitter and couldn’t help but laugh.  It’s an amusing twist on the Babe Ruth/Lou Gehrig “hit one for the sick child” legend.  The artist behind the strip appears to be one Nicholas Gurewitch.

PBFComic hit one