This day in baseball: The rookie puts on a hitting clinic

On September 30, 1893, the last day of the season, rookie Duff Cooley of the St. Louis Browns collected six hits to help destroy the Boston Beaneaters, 16-4. The twenty-year-old utility player accomplished the feat by hitting four singles, a double, and a triple at Robison Field in St. Louis.

Duff Cooley

Duff Cooley in 1905 (Library of Congress)


This day in baseball: Burkett hits .400 … again

September 26, 1896 marked the season finale for the Cleveland Spiders, which they played against the Louisville Colonels at Eclipse Park.  Cleveland outfielder Jesse Burkett collected three hits as the Spiders won, 4-3.  Burkett thus finished the season with a .410 batting average, making him the first player to hit .400 in consecutive years, having batted .405 the previous season.

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Jesse Burkett in 1903 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Out confusion

In a game between the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Stockings on September 14, 1872, the Athletics led 4-1 in the seventh inning with runners on first and second.  Fergy Malone popped up to shortstop George Wright, who caught the ball in his hat and then proceeded to throw the ball to third base.  The ball was then thrown to second base.  Wright claimed a double play has been completed, as a batter cannot be retired with a “hat catch,” and thus runners Cap Anson and Bob Reach should have been forced out.  This naturally caused some confusion, and ultimately , the umpire decided to give Malone another at bat, declaring nobody out on the play.  The Athletics won this game, 6-4.

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George Wright, 1872 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Welch wins 300

Pitcher Mickey Welch of the New York Giants reached the 300-victory milestone on July 28, 1890, making him the third pitcher in baseball history to reach the mark.  Welch defeated Pittsburgh 4-2 that day, and would go on to record seven more victories before retiring from the game.

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National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum


MLB Logos Through the Years

This video popped up on my YouTube feed yesterday.  (Thanks, YouTube, for stalking my viewing history to offer up this suggestion…)  While the video is a tad lengthy, it’s also quite fascinating.  It provides a history of logos of MLB teams, and even takes into account location and team name changes — for example, how the 1960s Washington Senators became the Texas Rangers, or how the Brooklyn Superbas eventually evolved into the present-day Los Angeles Dodgers.

Some of these logos I don’t think I’ve ever seen before.  Others I did remember, and they made me feel a bit nostalgic.  Sports evolution, every aspect of it, is an interesting phenomenon.


This day in baseball: Anson reaches 3,000

On July 16, 1897, Chicago Colts first baseman Cap Anson became the first player in major league history to collect 3,000 hits when he singled off Baltimore pitcher George Blackburn.  Anson was forty-five years old when he reached the milestone as Chicago lost to Baltimore, 2-1.

These days, some controversy remains as to whether or not Anson should be considered the first player to reach this milestone.  This hit total disregarded a rule in place for the 1887 season that counted bases-on-balls as hits.  Anson had collected 60 walks during the 1887 season.

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Cap Anson (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Clarke’s debut

Future Hall of Famer Fred Clarke made his major league debut on June 30, 1894.  Clarke went five-for-five for the Louisville Colonels, collecting four singles and a triple.

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Fred Clarke in 1903 (Library of Congress)