Cap Anson

cap anson

Cap Anson (Wikipedia)

Adrian Constantine “Cap” Anson was born on April 17, 1852 in a log cabin in Marshalltown, Iowa. He was the youngest son of Henry and Jeannette Rice Anson. Henry and Jeannette Anson had moved westward to the area from New York state with their oldest son, Sturgis, in a covered wagon, and young Adrian was the first pioneer child born in Marshalltown. Jeannette Anson died when Adrian was merely seven years old.

Henry Anson enrolled his sons in a preparatory course at the College of Notre Dame, and then later again at the state college in Iowa City (now the University of Iowa), but Adrian Anson was more interested in baseball and skating than in his studies.  As a teenager, Adrian earned a place on the town baseball team, the Marshalltown Stars. With Henry Anson playing third base, Adrian’s brother Sturgis in centerfield, and Adrian at second base, the Stars went on to win the Iowa state championship in 1868.

In 1870, the Rockford Forest City baseball club and its star pitcher, Al Spalding, came to Marshalltown for a pair of games. The Forest City team won both games, but the Anson men played so well that Rockford management sent contract offers to all three of the Ansons. Henry and Sturgis turned the offer down, but Adrian accepted and joined the Forest City team in the spring of 1871.

Adrian Anson batted .325 for Rockford while playing third base, but the team disbanded at the end of the season. He was then signed by the Philadelphia Athletics, where he batted .415 in 1872, third best in the National Association. In 1874, Cincinnati Red Stockings manager Harry Wright and pitcher Al Spalding organized a three-week trip to England. Both the Athletics and the Red Stockings sailed across the Atlantic to play both baseball and cricket in front of British crowds. Anson led both teams in hitting throughout the tour, and he and Spalding developed a friendship during this trip, as well.

Anson’s numbers declined slightly in 1874 and 1875, but he still captured the attention Chicago White Stockings president William Hulbert.  Anson signed with Chicago, and he went on to be named captain-manager of the club in 1879, moving across the diamond to play first base. His new role as captain-manager led to his nickname, “Cap,” short for “Captain Anson.” Under Anson’s leadership, the White Stockings won five pennants between 1880 and 1886. Anson introduced new tactics to the game, including the use of a third-base coach, having fielders back up one another, signaling batters, and the pitching rotation.

Anson played twenty-two seasons for Chicago, hitting at least .300 in twenty of those years. He led the league in RBIs eight times between 1880 and 1891, winning batting titles in 1881 and 1888. He retired after the 1897 season at the age of forty-five, having collected big league records for games, hits, at-bats, doubles and runs. He also finished with 3,081 hits, making him the first player ever to cross the 3,000-hit line.

After leaving Chicago, Anson managed the New York Giants for 22 games in 1898 before his big league career came to an end. He died on April 14, 1922 and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.


Batter Up!: Baseball at the Library of Congress webinar

Yesterday, I took part in the Library of Congress’s online webinar entitled “Batter Up! Baseball at the Library of Congress.”  Hosted by Peter Armenti of the LoC, the webinar covered the early years of the game, sharing a variety of slides from the LoC’s collection.

Bat and ball games have been around in a variety of forms for a long, long time.  What I didn’t realize was that versions of bat and ball games went back as far as ancient Egypt (though, the concept of hitting a ball with some form of club is honestly very elementary, so I don’t know why this surprised me).

ancient egypt bat and ball

Library of Congress

The webinar debunks the Abner Doubleday myth, which claimed Doubleday invented the game in 1839 in Cooperstown, New York, pointing out that early incarnations of baseball existed well ahead of the time of Doubleday’s supposed founding of the game.  For example, a game known as “Base Ball” was referred to in The Pretty Little Pocket Book in 1787, though the images of the game in said book look nothing like today’s pastime.

1787 Base Ball

Library of Congress

Base Ball gets referenced in a number of sources after that, including this 1823 article:

1823 Base Ball

Library of Congress

Industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century contributed to the rapid growth of the game.  Other sports, including horse racing and boxing, were popular at the time, but the appeal for these did not match the appeal of baseball.  Over time, the separation between work and play grew more pronounced in America, and baseball became a popular form of leisure in the off hours of industrial workers.  Over time, the rules of the game evolved, and in the mid-nineteenth century, the New York Knickerbockers were founded, leading to a greater standardization of baseball rules.

1862 Elysian Fields

The webinar goes into the development and codification of rules, including the establishment the 90-foot distance between bases, nine players per side, the elimination of “soaking,” and so on.  There were two versions of the game at first, the Massachusetts and the New York games, but in the end, the New York version of baseball won out.

Massachussetts vs New York baseball

Library of Congress

In the meantime, baseball spread rapidly, including a club in San Francisco in the mid-1800s that became California’s first (known) ball club.  The outbreak of the Civil War also contributed to the spread of baseball’s popularity.

Baseball was also being played within the black population in the late-nineteenth century, and women also participated in the game as well.  The webinar did not go into a lot of detail regarding these, but it did at least touch on them.

19th century black baseball

Library of Congress

In 1868, it became allowed (publicly) for players to get played (some players had been receiving under-the-table compensation prior to this).  In September of that year, the Cincinnati Red Stockings became the first all-professional ball team, bringing an end to the amateur baseball era.  The National Association of Professional Base Ball Players then became established in 1871, then today’s NL was established in 1876.

The Doubleday myth, as we know now, was the brainchild of Albert Spalding and the Mills Commission at the turn of the century.  Spalding despised the idea that baseball evolved from the English game of rounders, as was argued by Henry Chadwick, and thus he set out to prove its American origins.  Spalding released the commission’s findings of baseball’s origins in 1905.  The results were deemed official by the end of 1907, then published in Spalding’s Base Ball Guide in 1908.

Spalding

Library of Congress

The webinar picks apart the arguments of the Mills Commission, pointing out that it is not possible that Doubleday could have invented baseball.  Doubleday’s own lack of mentioning the game aside, the events outlined by the commission regarding baseball’s findings did not match up with the events of Doubleday’s life.

The webinar concluded with a brief question-and-answer session.  The bit about ancient Egypt aside, I can’t say I learned much new from the session, which naturally is going to happen when you attend a webinar about something you like to study anyhow.  However, it’s always nice to get a refresher on things, and the Library of Congress did a great job with this.


Quote of the day

Baseball is a man maker.

~Al Spalding

200px-AGSpalding

Wikimedia Commons


Ken Burns’s Baseball: The First Inning

In our sun-down perambulations, of late, through the outer parts of Brooklyn, we have observed several parties of youngsters playing base, a certain game of ball…Let us go forth awhile, and get better air in our lungs. Let us leave our close rooms…the game of ball is glorious.  ~Walt Whitman

Thus begins the first disc of Baseball: A Film By Ken Burns.  This is a series that I’ve checked out from the library and started watching multiple times, yet never managed to finish.  In an effort to change this, I’ve decided to commit myself to writing about each “Inning” of the series here.  This way, I have a form of accountability to encourage me to get through the whole thing.

Approximately the first twenty minutes of the first disc serve as kind of a nostalgic, feel-good introduction to the series and the game.  Images of Babe Ruth, Christy Mathewson, Jackie Robinson, Ted Williams, and several others flash across the screen to a background of melodic music and various speakers ruminating about what an incredible game baseball is.

The First Inning then begins with the myth of baseball’s founding by Abner Doubleday.  Burns describes the story behind Doubleday’s supposed invention of the game, then immediately refutes it, asserting that Doubleday likely never even saw a professional game.  Baseball, rather, is most likely a direct descendant of two British sports: rounders and cricket.  The game went through multiple variations until the founding of the New York Knickerbockers and the codification of rules by Alexander Cartwright.  Henry Chadwick soon appears on the scene and becomes instantly enamored with baseball.  Chadwick went on to invent the box score, using statistics to track players’ performances.  The National Association of Base Ball Players was then formed to help maintain control over the sport and further codify the rules.

The outbreak of the American Civil War presented a disruption to organized baseball.  On the other hand, it also served to help spread the game’s popularity as soldiers returning home at the end of the war took knowledge of the sport with them.  In spite of the end of slavery, black teams found themselves banned from organized leagues.  Women and girls, also, struggled for the right to play ball, as it was deemed too violent and dangerous for the fairer sex.

Burns chronicles the evolution of baseball from its status as an amateur pastime to a professional sport — a business.  It is evident from his focus on the establishment of the reserve clause that Burns intends to delve into the subject further.  It only makes sense to do so, of course, given the impact that this clause would have on the occurrence of so many events throughout the game’s history.  Burns also puts some attention on gambling, which, as we know, would also impact baseball’s timeline of events.

The First Inning covers the development of the NL, the AA, the Players’ League, and the rise of Albert Spalding.  A number of players are introduced, including Cy Young, Cap Anson, King Kelly, and John McGraw.  We also meet Moses Fleetwood Walker and the bigotry he faced in the big leagues as a black player.  This, followed closely by a discussion of Branch Rickey’s early life, present a foreshadowing recognizable by anyone familiar with the game’s history.

Most histories I have seen covering this period in baseball seem to treat the game with a kind of veneration.  Personally, this is perhaps my favorite period in the game’s history to learn about, possibly in part due to this sense of awe that it brings out about baseball.  So much of what happens next has already been established, yet there is still something pure and clean about baseball during the 19th century.

 


This day in baseball: Mark Twain’s umbrella

On May 18, 1875, writer Samuel Clemens (a.k.a. Mark Twain) attended a game between the Boston Red Stockings and the Hartford Dark Blues.  A record crowd of 10,000 fans attended the match-up between the two teams, both undefeated up to this point in the season.  The visiting Red Stockings defeated the Dark Blues, 10-5, led by captain and pitcher, Albert Goodwill “Al” Spalding.

During the game, a young boy snagged an umbrella belonging to Clemens when he stood up to root for the home team.  A couple days later, Clemens published the following notice in the Hartford Courant newspaper:

To the Public

TWO HUNDRED & FIVE DOLLARS REWARD–At the great baseball match on Tuesday, while I was engaged in hurrahing, a small boy walked off with an English-made brown silk UMBRELLA belonging to me, & forgot to bring it back. I will pay $5 for the return of that umbrella in good condition to my house on Farmington avenue. I do not want the boy (in an active state) but will pay two hundred dollars for his remains.
Samuel L. Clemens.

Mark_Twain

Mark Twain (Library of Congress)


This day in baseball: The founding of Spalding sporting goods

Spending $800 to start, former baseball player Albert Spalding founded a sporting goods company on February 3, 1886.  Spalding became the manufacturer of the first official baseball, and would also become the first manufacturer of the official tennis ball, basketball, golf ball, and football.

Wikimedia Commons

Wikimedia Commons


Alexander Cartwright

Alexander Cartwright is often referred to today as The Father of Modern Baseball.  Unlike Abner Doubleday, whose involvement in the beginnings of baseball is virtually a proven myth, Cartwright’s role in the establishment of this great game is more soundly documented.  In 1845, Cartwright and the members of the New York Knickerbockers Base Ball Club codified the first set of rules and regulations for the game as we recognize it today. The rules were widely adopted and eventually evolved into the modern game.

Photo source: Baseball-Almanac

Variations of rules for early baseball existed before Cartwright, but it was the Knickerbockers who first committed a set of regulations to paper.  Cartwright is credited with publishing the idea of foul territory, for eliminating the practice of “soaking” (that is, throwing the ball at the runner as a method for getting him out), and for setting the distance between bases (though, at the time, was still a vague definition, described as “forty-two paces” from first base to third and from home plate to second base).  For a list of the Knickerbocker Rules, click here.

Born April 17, 1820 in New York, New York, Alexander Joy Cartwright, Jr. was the son of a merchant sea captain.  In 1836, at the age of sixteen, Cartwright began working as a clerk in a broker’s office on Wall Street, Coit & Cochrane.  He later worked as a clerk for Union Bank of New York.  After working hours, Cartwright could usually be found on the streets playing games of ball with other New York men.  When the Union Bank burned down in a fire in 1845, Cartwright joined his brother, Alfred, as a bookseller.

Naturally, Cartwright had a life outside of work and playing ball.  On June 2, 1842, he married Eliza Van Wie, and the couple went on to have three children: DeWitt, Mary, and Catherine Lee.  Additionally, Cartwright served as a volunteer fireman.  At one point, he served at the Knickerbocker Engine Company No. 12, which, it is believed, may be how the young men who played ball with Cartwright named their club.

The New York Knickerbockers, circa 1847 (Photo source: Wikimedia Commons)

In September of 1845, Cartwright and the rest of the Knickerbockers traveled across the Hudson River to Elysian Fields in Hoboken, New Jersey.  Here they drew up the constitution and bylaws which became known as the “Knickerbocker Rules” or the “Cartwright Rules.”  They played their first recorded game on October 6, 1845 and recorded their first game against another team on June 19, 1846 against the New York Club.  The New York Club won the game 23-1.

Details about Cartwright’s life from 1846 to 1849 remain vague.  After gold was discovered in California in 1848, Cartwright decided to head west in March 1849.  Some claim that, on his way to California, Cartwright played and taught baseball all across the plains, but these claims remain unsubstantiated.  Shortly after arriving in California, Cartwright sailed to Hawaii in August 1849.  Here he became a bookkeeper in a ship chandler’s business.  He also served as fire chief of Honolulu from 1850 to 1863.  He and Eliza had two more children in Honolulu, Bruce and Alexander III.

In 1875, King Kalakaua, for whom Cartwright served as financial advisor, became the first Hawaiian monarch to attend a baseball game.  The game was played between the Athletes and the Pensacolas.  Whether Cartwright had a role in introducing baseball to Hawaii, however, remains unclear.  Nor is he mentioned in playing a role in the 1888-89 World Tour of Albert Spalding’s Chicago White Stockings, which included a trip to Honolulu.

Alexander Cartwright died on July 12, 1892.  His obituary, published in the Hawaiian Gazette and the Pacific Commercial Advertiser stated, “To publish more than an epitome of the eventful life of A. J. Cartwright is not practicable in a work of this character. He was one of the early argonauts of California, and his biography would, if exhaustively written, be extremely interesting. It would indeed fill a volume, and be an invaluable text book [sic] to place in the hands of the rising generation to reflect upon and emulate.”

Cartwright was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938.

____________________________________________

Sources:

“Alexander Cartwright.”  Baseball Reference, 2011.  Sports Reference, LLC, 2000-2013.  Web.  Accessed 20 December 2013.  http://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/Alexander_Cartwright

Cartwright, Alexander.  “The Knickerbocker Rules.”  23 September 1845.  The Baseball Almanac.  Baseball-Almanac.  Web.  Accessed 20 December 2013.  http://www.baseball-almanac.com/rule11.shtml

“Cartwright, Alexander.”  National Baseball Hall of Fame.  Web.  Accessed 18 December 2013. http://baseballhall.org/hof/cartwright-alexander

Nucciarone, Monica.  “Alexander Cartwright.”  SABR Baseball Biography Project.  Society for American Baseball Research, 2013.  Web.  Accessed 19 December 2013. http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/09ed3dd4