Quote of the day

Hell, better hitters than them couldn’t hit me. Why should they’ve been any different?

~Jackie Mitchell, on striking out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig

Woman Pitcher Jackie Mitchell
Jackie Mitchell, 1931 (Mark Rucker/Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)

“Along Came Ruth,” by Ford Frick

This poem by Ford Frick ends with the line, “Nothing’s simpler than that!”, which is quite fitting, as this piece is pretty straightforward. This was published in Ford Frick’s memoir, Games, Asterisks, and People: Memoirs of a lucky fan.

*

You step up to the platter
And you gaze with flaming hate
At the poor benighted pitcher
As you dig in at the plate.
You watch him cut his fast ball loose,
Then swing your trusty bat
And you park one in the bleachers-
Nothing’s simpler than that!

Ford_Frick_at_1937_All-Star_Game - Library of Congress
Ford Frick at the 1937 All-Star Game (Library of Congress)

This day in baseball: Babe Ruth released by Yankees

On February 27, 1935, after 15 seasons with the New York Yankees, Babe Ruth‘s career with the Bronx Bombers came to an end when he was released by the team. Ruth went on to sign with the Boston Braves as Vice President, assistant manager, and active player for $20,000 and a share in the team’s profits. That April, he drew the largest Opening Day crowd in the Braves’ history and would continue to be a major crowd attraction until he retired that June.

babe-ruth-boston-braves

Quote of the day

Let there be joy in baseball again, like in the days when Babe Ruth chased an enemy sportswriter down the streets of Boston and ended up getting drunk with him on the waterfront and came back the next day munching on hotdogs and boomed homeruns to the glory of God.

~Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac - The New Yorker
The New Yorker

Quote of the day

Honestly, at one time I thought Babe Ruth was a cartoon character. I really did, I mean, I wasn’t born until 1961, and I grew up in Indiana.

~Don Mattingly

600px-Don_Mattingly_playing_for_the_New_York_Yankees_at_Yankee_Stadium_on_August_19,_1988 - Wikipedia
Mattingly in 1988 (Wikipedia)

This day in baseball: Ruth’s first start

Babe Ruth made his first career start on the mound on March 25, 1914 for the Boston Red Sox. The 19-year-old pitcher defeated the world champion Philadelphia Athletics, 6-2, in an exhibition game played in Wilmington, North Carolina. Prior to this game, Ruth had faced 29 batters in relief, allowing just six hits, thus earning his spot in the starting rotation.

Babe Ruth pitching (Bleacher Report)