This day in baseball: Class size: 0

The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) voted, via mail, to select from major league players retired less than 25 years for the Hall of Fame class of 1950.  On February 16 of that year, the organization ended up selecting no one for induction.  The top vote-getters in the balloting were former Giants Mel Ott (69%) and Bill Terry (63%), however, this fell short of the 75% of the writers’ ballots required for induction.  Ott would get elected the following season, and Terry entered the Hall of Fame in 1954.

baseball

Mel Ott (ESPN.com)


This day in baseball: MVP dominance

On November 19, 2001, the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) determined in a landslide vote to award the NL Most Valuable Player Award to Giants slugger Barry Bonds.  Bonds won 30 of 32 first place votes, winning his fourth career MVP award — the most by any single player to that point.  Bonds went on to accumulate a total of seven MVP awards in his career, which remains the most for any given player.

Wikimedia Commons

Wikimedia Commons


This day in baseball

On November 5, 1976, for the second consecutive season, Orioles pitcher Jim Palmer won the Cy Young Award.  In the voting cast by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA), Palmer won 19 of 24 first place votes.  That season, Palmer finished with a record of 22-13, a 2.51 ERA, and an average of 4.5 strikeouts per nine innings.

Palmer Jim Plaque_NBL


This day in baseball: Cy Young tie

Photo source: PDXRetro.com

In 1969, two pitchers tied in the voting for the Cy Young award for the first time in baseball history.  Denny McLain of the Detroit Tigers finished the season with a 24-9 record and a 2.80 ERA.  Meanwhile, the Baltimore Orioles’ Mike Cuellar finished with a 23-11 record and an ERA of 2.38.  Both men received ten votes from the BBWAA (Baseball Writer’s Association of America) as being the best pitcher in the American League.