“The Beaning”: Horror Short Documentary

Over the weekend, I watched the latest movie iteration of It, and it prompted my curiosity to do a search of the phrase “baseball horror.”  I didn’t actually expect to find much, but much to my surprise, I found this little documentary (if you can call it that) that ALTER released earlier this year.

To be honest, I cannot say that I’m a particularly big fan of this short little spoof, though it does put forth a weirdly interesting theory.  The video proposes that the death of Ray Chapman as a result of being beaned in the head by Carl Mays was actually a form of occult human sacrifice.  The payoff of the sacrifice?  The rise of the New York Yankees as a baseball empire.

While I do agree with the video’s assertion that baseball can be a form of religion for some folks, the whole occult/human sacrifice bit seems a bit far-fetched to me.  But, here, you can judge for yourself.


This day in baseball: Carl Mays beans Tris Speaker

On May 20, 1918, Indians outfielder Tris Speaker was hit in the head by a pitch thrown by Red Sox hurler Carl Mays.  A right-handed submarine pitcher, Mays denied Speaker’s allegation that the beanball pitch was intentional.  Mays pitched a complete game, winning 11-1 that day.  The beanball would prove a precursor to the pitch that would kill Ray Chapman two years later.

Carl Mays

Carl Mays (SABR)


This day in baseball: A long way to tie

On July 14, 1916, the Browns’ Ernie Koob pitched a 17-inning complete game against the Red Sox.  For the Sox, Carl Mays pitched 15 innings, with  Dutch Leonard finishing the final innings of the contest.  The game ended in a 0-0 tie.

Ernie_Koob

Ernie Koob, 1917 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Death by pitch

Ray Chapman (Photo source: The New York Times)

In a game against the Yankees on 16 August 1920, Cleveland infielder Ray Chapman was hit in the head by a pitch thrown by Carl Mays.  Though, according to some accounts, the pitch barely missed the strike zone, Chapman had been crowding the plate against the submarine huler.  Carl Mays was also well-known as a headhunter when it came to hitters who crowded the plate, and few doubted that the inside pitch was accidental (not that Mays intended to kill, of course).  After being struck by the pitch, Chapman was taken from the Polo Grounds to the hospital, where Dr. T. M. Merrigan performed surgery.  He never regained consciousness, however, and Chapman died twelve hours later, at 4:40 a.m. on 17 August.  It is the only case in Major League history in which a ballplayer died as a direct result of being hit by a pitch.

Of the tragedy, the New York Tribune wrote:

The extreme rarity of fatal or even of serious accidents in baseball is surprising, when one remembers the vast multitudes who play the game. Consider the number who are drowned while bathing or boating, who meet injury or death while hunting. In the light of such comparisons baseball is singularly free from untoward happenings. Ray Chapman’s fate, sad as it is, may be rated as sheer accident. It represents a coincidence not likely to occur again.

English: 's grave in Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland

Chapman’s grave in Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland (Photo source: Wikipedia)

Nevertheless, the incident resulted in some rule changes in Major League Baseball.  The following season, the league established a rule that required umpires to replace the baseball anytime it got dirty (prior to this, pitchers made a point to dirty them up as much as possibly, in order to make them more difficult for a batter to see).  The banning of the spitball after the 1920 season was also due in part to Chapman’s death.  Interestingly, however, it would be another thirty years before batting helmets would be invented.

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Sources:

“Beaned by a Pitch, Ray Chapman Dies.”  The New York Times, August 17, 1920.  The New York Times Company,  2004.  Web.  Accessed 17 August 2013.  http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/sports/year_in_sports/08.17.html

Gorman, Bob.  “‘I Guess I Forgot to Duck’: On-Field Player Fatalities in the Minor Leagues.”  Nine 11.2 (Spring 2003).

“Ray Chapman.”  BaseballLibrary.com.  The Idea Logical Company, Inc., 2006.  Web.  Accessed 17 August 2013.  http://www.baseballlibrary.com/ballplayers/player.php?name=Ray_Chapman_1891