This day in baseball: 1939 All-Star Game

The 1939 All-Star Game was held on July 11th at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, where the American League defeated the National League, 3-1.  Two of the three AL runs were driven in by Yankees players (the third was an unearned run scored on an error), including a DiMaggio home run.  Indians pitcher Bob Feller, only twenty years old at the time, threw 3.2 scoreless innings to earn the save.

The box score for the game can be found here.

bob feller

Bob Feller (Wikimedia Commons)


This day in baseball: Bradley’s four-game streak

On May 24, 1902, Cleveland third baseman Bill Bradley became the American League’s first player to hit a home run in each of four consecutive games.  This record would not be matched until Babe Ruth accomplished the same in June of 1918.

Bill_Bradley_Baseball

Library of Congress


This day in baseball: Jersey numbers everywhere

For the first time in history, on May 13, 1929, a major league game featured both teams wearing numbers on the backs of their jerseys.  The Indians played host to the Yankees at League Park in Cleveland, winning by a score of 4-3.  The digits would become a permanent fixture on each club’s ensemble.

1929 cleveland uniform

1929 Cleveland uniform (baseballhalloffame.org)

 


This day in baseball: Three times three

In the first game of a doubleheader played on August 27, 1938, the Yankee Clipper, Joe DiMaggio, hit three consecutive triples against the Indians.  DiMaggio’s feat helped the Yankees en route to an 8-7 victory over Cleveland.

The box score for the game can be found here.

dimaggio

New York Post


This day in baseball: Double triple steal

At Cleveland’s League Park on July 25, 1930, the Philadelphia Athletics pulled off a rare triple steal in the first inning of a game against the Indians, then proceeded to repeat the feat in the fourth inning.  The A’s pounded Cleveland 14-1 in that game.

1930 Philadelphia Athletics

the deadballera.com


This day in baseball: Double fest

On July 21, 1921, the Yankees and the Indians hit a collective total of 21 doubles, establishing an American League record.  Cleveland collected nine of the two-baggers, defeating New York 17-8 at League Park.

League Park Cleveland

Wikipedia


This day in baseball: Feller’s first major league appearance

In his first major league appearance on July 6, 1936, seventeen-year-old Indians rookie Bob Feller pitched in an All-Star break exhibition game against the Cardinals’ Gashouse Gang.  After the first batter was thrown out trying to bunt, Feller proceeded to strike out eight consecutive batters in three innings.

bob feller

Wikimedia Commons


This day in baseball: Carl Mays beans Tris Speaker

On May 20, 1918, Indians outfielder Tris Speaker was hit in the head by a pitch thrown by Red Sox hurler Carl Mays.  A right-handed submarine pitcher, Mays denied Speaker’s allegation that the beanball pitch was intentional.  Mays pitched a complete game, winning 11-1 that day.  The beanball would prove a precursor to the pitch that would kill Ray Chapman two years later.

Carl Mays

Carl Mays (SABR)


This day in baseball: Feller’s contract

Twenty-two-year-old Bob Feller signed a deal with the Indians on January 21, 1941 reportedly worth $30,000.  This made Feller the highest paid pitcher in baseball history.  The previous high salary for a single season of pitching had been $27,500 to Dazzy Vance and Lefty Grove.

bob feller

Wikimedia Commons


This day in baseball: Speaker resigns as manager

Tris Speaker resigned as Indians manager on November 29, 1926, after a scandal broke in which pitcher Dutch Leonard claimed that Speaker and Ty Cobb fixed at least one game between Cleveland and the Detroit Tigers.  Umpire Billy Evans called these accusations “purely a matter of personal revenge” for Leonard, who is reported to have been upset with Cobb and Speaker after a trade ended with Leonard in the minor leagues.  Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis cleared both Speaker and Cobb of any wrongdoing when Leonard did not show up at a hearing to discuss his accusations.

Tris_Speaker

Wikimedia Commons