Don Drysdale’s Hall of Fame induction speech

Don Drysdale emphasizes the strain and sacrifices that come with the demanding schedule of a professional ballplayer — especially on the side of that ballplayer’s family.  A right-handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers for his entire career, Drysdale won the 1962 Cy Young Award, and in 1968, he set a Major League record by pitching six consecutive shutouts and ​58 2⁄3 consecutive scoreless innings.  Drysdale ended his career with 209 wins, 2,486 strikeouts, 167 complete games and 49 shutouts. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.


R.I.P. Roy Halladay

It’s always gut wrenching to hear of the death of a player who left such a mark on the game.  Roy Halladay was known as an impressively hard worker, and his effort showed in his play.  He was an eight-time All-Star and a two-time Cy Young winner.  He threw a perfect game against the Marlins on May 29, 2010, and during the 2010 NLDS, Halladay threw a second no-hitter against the Reds.  It made him only the fifth pitcher in major league history to throw multiple no-hitters in a single season.

Rest in peace, Roy Halladay.

 

halladay

Wikipedia

 


This day in baseball: Hershiser’s pay cut

On February 7, 1987, Dodger pitcher Orel Hershiser signed for $800,000, a twenty-percent pay-cut from the year before.  It was the second time since the practice of arbitration has been implemented that a player was forced to take less.  After winning the Cy Young Award and leading the team to a World Series championship in 1988, however, the Hershiser became the highest-paid player in the big leagues.

orel_hershiser

LA Times


This day in baseball: Unanimous Cy Young winner

On November 12, 1986, Roger Clemens of the Red Sox became only the second American League pitcher to unanimously win the Cy Young Award.  Clemens had posted a 24-4 record, with an ERA of 2.48 for the season. The first AL pitcher to win the Cy Young by unanimous vote was Denny McLain in 1968.

SIKids.com

SIKids.com


This day in baseball

On November 25, 1981, Rollie Fingers of the Milwaukee Brewers became the first relief pitcher ever to win the American League MVP award.  He narrowly beat Rickey Henderson by 11 points for the honor, taking 15 first place votes to Henderson’s 12.  That year, Rollie Fingers also won the Cy Young Award for the American League.

USA Today

USA Today


This day in baseball

On November 5, 1976, for the second consecutive season, Orioles pitcher Jim Palmer won the Cy Young Award.  In the voting cast by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA), Palmer won 19 of 24 first place votes.  That season, Palmer finished with a record of 22-13, a 2.51 ERA, and an average of 4.5 strikeouts per nine innings.

Palmer Jim Plaque_NBL


This day in baseball: The first Cy Young Award

The first Cy Young Award was given out following the 1956 season, and, at the time, it was given only to the single best pitcher in both leagues.  Brooklyn pitcher Don Newcombe became the first ever Cy Young winner, finishing the season with a 27-7 record and a 3.06 ERA.  The Cy Young would continue to be given to only one pitcher each year until 1967, when it then started being given to one pitcher in each league.

Don Newcombe (Photo source: SIKids.com)