This day in baseball: Kenesaw Mountain Landis is hired

U.S. District Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis accepted the offer to become baseball’s first commissioner on November 12, 1920.  The decision to hire a commissioner came in the wake of the 1919 World Series scandal, which involved eight White Sox players who were paid off by gamblers to throw the Series against Cincinnati.  Landis would officially begin his new role in January 1921.

Landis_portrait-restored


Baseball at the Met

Yesterday I happened across a tidbit stating that one of the largest baseball card collections resides at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  I’ve never been a card collector, so I suppose this might already be common knowledge and I’ve just been out of the loop.  I did want to check it out all the same, so I poked around and discovered that the Met is in the process of cataloging the cards, all part of the Jefferson R. Burdick collection, online.  You can find the collection here.

Just minutes of exploring has revealed some gems, such as this collection of cartooned baseball stars from 1943:

Burdick 324(2)

Metropolitan Museum of Art

And these old school pennants from 1933.

1933 baseball pennants.PNG

Metropolitan Museum of Art

And there are, of course, a myriad of traditional baseball cards:

Jimmy Foxx 1935 baseball card

Metropolitan Museum of Art

I have to say, this is my type of card collection.  A variety of cards, and yet virtual so that they don’t actually take up a bunch of physical space.  Happy exploring!


This day in baseball: Mr. Cub is MVP again

Ernie Banks won his second consecutive MVP award on November 4, 1959.  Mr. Cub finished the season with a .304 batting average and 143 RBIs, including 45 home runs.  Banks collected ten of the writers’ 21 first-place votes, with Eddie Mathews (5) and Hank Aaron (2) of the Braves and Dodger Wally Moon (4) dividing the rest of the first-place votes.

Ernie_Banks_1955_Bowman_card


This day in baseball: MVP Jeter

On October 26, 2000, Derek Jeter was named World Series MVP, making him the first player to win both All-Star Game MVP and World Series MVP in the same season.  Jeter hit .409 in the World Series that year, including two doubles, a triple, and a couple of home runs to help the Yankees win four games to one over the New York Mets.

Derek Jeter

Wikimedia Commons


This day in baseball: Jackie Robinson passes

Jackie Robinson passed away at the age of 53 on October 24, 1972 as a result of a heart attack.  Robinson’s death came nine days after his appearance at the World Series, where he threw the ceremonial first pitch before Game 2 at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Stadium.  Robinson died in his home in North Stamford, Connecticut following complications of heart disease and diabetes.

Jackie Robinson


This day in baseball: Dinneen’s complete season

On October 10, 1904, 41-game winner Jack Chesbro of the Highlanders let loose a wild pitch in the ninth inning of the final game of the season.  This snapped a 2-2 tie, allowing Pilgrims right-hander Bill Dinneen to claim victory as the Boston team claimed the AL pennant.  Dinneen finished the year having completed every game he started during the season, throwing 337.2 consecutive innings without relief during his streak of 37 consecutive complete games.

1900_Bill_Dinneen.jpeg

Bill Dinneen (The Sporting News)


This day in baseball: One hundred-loss matchup

For the second time in major league history, two one hundred-loss teams faced one another on October 6, 1923.  The 52-100 Beaneaters beat the 50-102 Phillies, 5-4, in the first game of a doubleheader.  Boston had also been part of the first one hundred-loss matchup when the 50-100 club played 45-103 Brooklyn in 1905.

Philadelphia Phillies 1923-1924

Philadelphia Phillies logo, 1923-1924 (Business Insider)