This day in baseball: Evers suspended

After swearing at umpire Mal Eason on September 10, 1914, Braves shortstop Johnny Evers wound up with a three-day suspension from baseball. Evers, however, insisted that he had been talking to the ball and not the umpire.

johnny evers

Johnny Evers (Fenway Park Diaries)


This day in baseball: Rucker no-hits Boston

Nap Rucker of the Brooklyn Superbas threw a no-hitter against the Boston Doves on September 5, 1908.  Rucker struck out 14 doves en route to the no-no as the Superbas won the contest, 6-0.

nap rucker

New Georgia Encyclopedia


This day in baseball: Three times three

In the first game of a doubleheader played on August 27, 1938, the Yankee Clipper, Joe DiMaggio, hit three consecutive triples against the Indians.  DiMaggio’s feat helped the Yankees en route to an 8-7 victory over Cleveland.

The box score for the game can be found here.

dimaggio

New York Post


This day in baseball: The longest hit streak comes to an end

The longest hit streak in professional baseball history ended on August 20, 1919, when Joe Wilhoit of the Wichita Jobbers was held hitless by the Tulsa Oilers in the Western League.  From June 14th to August 19th, 1919, Wilhoit went 153-for-297, giving him a .515 batting average en route to the record streak.  The streak included four home runs, nine triples, and twenty-four doubles.

Joe_Wilhoit

The Sporting News


Quote of the day

People say, ‘Don’t live in the past.’ But I guess it depends on how interesting your past is.

~Effa Manley

Effa Manley

Wikipedia


This day in baseball: Double steal fiasco

On August 13, 1902, the Philadelphia A’s attempted a double steal against the Tigers.  Harry Davis took off from first base while Dave Fultz, the runner on third, waited for the Tigers to make the throw.  However, Detroit conceded second base to Davis, thus holding Fultz to third.

Not willing to give up the play so easily, Davis returned to first base on the next pitch.  He took off for second base again, this time drawing a throw.  Fultz managed to score from third on the throw, and Davis was called safe at second.

Davis was credited with just one stolen base out of the ordeal.

Harry H. Davis Philadelphia 1911

Harry Davis (Wikipedia)


Baseball Legend Joe DiMaggio, by Geoffrey Giuliano

I came across this audiobook, Baseball Legend Joe DiMaggio, through the local library and spent my lunch break yesterday listening to it.  Written and narrated by Geoffrey Giuliano, I wondered at first why this biography came only in audio format, with no hard copy or even ebook version.  As I listened, however, the reason quickly became apparent.

Joe DiMaggio Giuliano

The recording opens up with a broad, sweeping biography of DiMaggio, which takes up only about the first five or ten minutes of the hour-long book.  This biography serves to set the foundation for the rest of the book, which turns out to be a sort of audio documentary of Joe DiMaggio’s life.

The audiobook features recordings of a variety of interviews, some with DiMaggio himself, others with broadcasters from both that era and the present day.  Also included are snippets from actual radio broadcasts during that era.  Giuliano provides the context for the various audio clips, which cover everything from DiMaggio’s early life to his war service, his 56-game hitting streak to his marriage to Marilyn Monroe, his relationship with his teammates to his life post-baseball.

Overall, I found it a fascinating experience to listen to the various clips.  As I mentioned, the entire audiobook is only about an hour long, which made for an enjoyable lunch break.  If you enjoy listening to old interviews and other audio clips, it’s worth checking out.