Happy 4th!

To all my readers in the States, Happy Independence Day! Stay safe and don’t forget to check on your furry friends during all the chaos.

See the source image

Happy Star Wars Day!

While it doesn’t look like there’s going to be the typical “Star Wars Night” promotions going at at ballparks tonight, it appears that ESPN has found another way to exploit the fan holiday. I won’t be watching the broadcast (I don’t have ESPN), but that won’t stop me from indulging in a Star Wars movie or two in honor of the day.

May the Force be with you all!

See the source image

Happy Valentine’s Day

From what I’ve seen and heard, not too many folks are going to be celebrating this year, but if you are, enjoy the day! If you are not celebrating Valentine’s Day, just remember, we’re only 3 days away from the start of Spring Training.

See the source image

Happy end of 2020!

Happy New Year, everyone! Please continue to stay safe, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for a better year in 2021.


Season’s Greetings!

I hope that everyone is having a lovely holiday season. Stay safe, everybody.


Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving to all my U.S. readers. With a little luck and good behavior on all our parts, next year’s Thanksgiving will turn out better than this year!

See the source image

Happy Halloween!

I hope everyone has a safe and enjoyable Halloween. If you happen to have plans for trick-or-treating, please remember to wear a mask, use hand sanitizer, and just be smart about it in general. The way 2020 has been going so far, this is a good night to be especially vigilant.

See the source image

Happy Independence Day!

To all my readers in the States, please have a safe holiday.  Wear your masks, wash your hands, keep social distancing, and if you’re going to use fireworks, please be mindful of others when doing so.


Learning to swing a bat: A brief note for Father’s Day

My dad was the first person to show me how to swing a baseball bat.  I believe we were still living in San Diego at the time, and we were spending the day at the park as a family.  My younger brother had received a yellow plastic bat with a white plastic ball for Christmas (or was it for his birthday?), and we now stood on a rough little baseball field at said park.   The grass in the outfield shone a rich green, with a few weeds scattered in, and the backstop consisted of a chain link fence and nothing more.  There were no dugouts, no bleachers, no bases.  I can’t remember whether my mom or my brother stood at the makeshift mound to do the pitching (underhand, of course), but my dad positioned himself at home plate with me.

I am right-handed, so Dad showed me which side of the plate to stand as a righty.  And when I cocked the bat with my left hand on top, Dad explained to me that I needed to switch my grip — right hand over left.  He taught me to keep my back elbow up and he showed me how to step into the pitch with my front foot.  I don’t think I had much success in making contact with any of the pitches that came my way that day.  Or, if I did, I didn’t manage to do anything impressive enough to be worth remembering.  That part doesn’t matter, though.  Dad’s lesson stuck with me through backyard baseball with my brothers and through the occasional schoolyard game.  When I started Little League a few years later, I already knew the fundamentals of how to grip the bat at the plate, and some of the other kids starting out didn’t have a clue.  It gave me a boost of confidence as I embarked on learning the sport, and confidence is key when one is so young.

My dad has taught me so many other things besides how to swing a bat, of course.  When I was very young, Dad created a clock with moveable hands out of pink and blue construction paper, and over the course of many evenings, he patiently taught me how to tell time.  As a teenager, Dad taught me how to drive.  I know how to change a tire, how to check the air pressure, and how check the dipstick in my car.  I know how to do a proper pushup, how to run a lawnmower, and how to perform standard maintenance on that lawnmower.  I even know that when you assemble a piece of furniture, you shouldn’t completely tighten all the screws until the very end.  There are so many other things beyond the items listed here that Dad has taught me (and continues to teach me), and I am forever grateful for it.  Because, even as an adult, having an idea of how to do these kinds of things is a real confidence booster.

Happy Father’s Day, Dad!


Happy Memorial Day

A sincere thank you to all who serve!