Charlie Brown on deck

About a month ago, we took a look at an ecstatic Charlie Brown celebrating his gloriously unexpected, game-winning home run.  But what happened in the moments leading up to that blast?  Let’s take a look.

charlie brown


No signals

Here’s a cartoon by Willard Mullin that makes me want to chuckle and face palm simultaneously.  I’m not sure who you are, Brooklyn runner, but you and your team are doing it wrong.

willard-mullin-baseball-01


Quote of the day

I was in Little League. I was on first base-I stole third base. I ran straight across the diamond. Earlier in the week, I learned the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. I argue with the umpire that second base was out of my way.

~Steve Wright

 

steve wright

fenwaynation.com

 


Anime baseball

This short film by Corridor Digital takes our National Pastime a represents it with an Anime twist.  The driving idea behind this video (and, it appears, a few others that they’ve done) is: What happens when you take something normal and turn it into anime?

As a heads up, the plot, the dialogue, and the internal monologues throughout this clip are extremely cheesy, but then again, that’s half the fun.  I’m generally pretty indifferent to anime, but I must confess, I found this little spiel quite entertaining.


Pitching signs

Everybody’s watching.  It’s a good thing baseball employs super secret signal systems to ensure that important messages get out to everyone on the field.

 

Baseball Signals 2

John McPherson

 


Pitching help

Ouch.

Fergus


Bad News Bears

bad news bears

The other baseball-related activity from my New York trip was a viewing of the movie The Bad News Bears (1976 version), which, believe it or not, I had never seen before.  I had heard of it, of course, though I really only had a vague notion of what the movie was about.

Walter Matthau (“Hey, Mr. Wilson!”) plays Morris Buttermaker, a former minor league ballplayer turned alcoholic who has been drafted to coach a team of misfit little leaguers.  The season does not start out well for the Bears.  In their first game against the appropriately-named Yankees, the Bears do not even record an out, and Buttermaker finally opts to forfeit on the team’s behalf.

Buttermaker eventually comes around and realizes he needs to do something more than just drink beer in order to help the team, and so he recruits 11-year-old girl pitcher Amanda as well as town bad boy Kelly Leak to play outfield.  As is the case in any kids sports movie like this, the addition of these two players is exactly the boost the Bears need to start winning.  Next thing we know, they are playing in the championship game.

Naturally, there are other hiccups along the way.  Being the daughter of Buttermaker’s ex-girlfriend, Amanda drops hints continuously that she would like to see her mother and her coach get back together.  Kelly’s reputation does little to earn him any friends, especially not when Buttermaker encourages him to become a ball hog to try to ensure the Bears make it to the championship.  We even see some conflict on the opposing team’s side of the ball, as the Yankees pitcher finally decides he’s had enough of the pressure his coach and father has been putting on him.

The Bad News Bears is definitely a comedy, though not quite your typical kids movie comedy.  It’s got an additional edge of profanity and crudeness to it that would make hardcore Disney parents freak out.  I’m sure there are plenty of folks out there who wouldn’t be quite so appreciative of this aspect of it, and understandably so, if you’ve got small children.  As an adult with a slightly twisted sense of humor and an appreciation for realism, however, I certainly enjoyed it.