This day in baseball: D.C. Stadium opens for baseball

On April 9, 1962, President John F. Kennedy waited out a rain delay and threw the ceremonial first pitch to open up Washington’s new $23 million D.C. Stadium for its inaugural baseball season.  The stadium had initially opened the previous fall for Redskins football on October 1, 1961.  More than 44,000 fans attended the Senators’ Opening Day in April as they defeated the Detroit Tigers, 4-1.

First_pitch_DC_Stadium_JFK

Wikipedia


This day in baseball: JFK’s first pitch

At Griffith Stadium on April 10, 1961, President John F. Kennedy threw out the first pitch, launching the inaugural season of the “new” Washington Senators.  The throw was the longest and hardest thrown ceremonial first pitch in history, as it flew over the players lined up in front of the presidential box.  In the game, the White Sox defeated the Senators 4-3.

The video below not only shows the first pitch, but also explains how the “old” Senators had moved to Minnesota to become the Twins.


Quote of the day

We are inclined to think that if we watch a football game or a baseball game, we have taken part in it.

~John F. Kennedy

The White House Historical Association

The White House Historical Association