This day in baseball: A DH proposal

In an effort to speed up the game and add more offense, on December 11, 1928, National League president John Heydler proposed instituting a designated batter for the pitcher. The American League oppose the idea, however, and the NL withdrew the proposal before it could get to Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis to break the deadlock.

John Heydler 1918 - The Sporting News
John Heydler, 1918 (The Sporting News)

This day in baseball: Frick is NL’s public relations director

On Feburary 6, 1934, New York news reporter and broadcaster Ford Frick was named the National League’s public relations director. In November of that same year, Frick would be elected as the president of the Senior Circuit, replacing John A. Heydler, who resigned due to poor health.

Ford_Frick_at_1937_All-Star_Game - Library of Congress
Ford Frick at the 1937 All-Star Game (Library of Congress)

This day in baseball: Landis becomes commissioner

To replace the three-man National Commission, formerly governed by league presidents Ban Johnson and John Heydler and Reds owner Garry Herrmann, Kenesaw Mountain Landis became baseball’s first commissioner on January 21, 1921. After expressing initial reluctance, Landis accepted the job in November 1920 for seven years at a salary of $50,000, on condition he could remain on the federal bench.

Landis
Landis opens the 1921 season (The Outlook)