This day in baseball: 1957 NL pennant

Thanks to Hank Aaron’s 11th inning home run, the Milwaukee Braves defeated the Cardinals 4-2 to clinch the 1957 National League pennant.  It was the first time since the 1950 season that a team not from New York state finished first in the National League.  From 1951 to 1956, NL pennants were split between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants.

 

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Hank Aaron (Baseball Digest)

 


This day in baseball

Jim ‘Nixey’ Callahan threw the White Sox’s first no-hitter in franchise history on September 20, 1902, defeating the Tigers, 2-0.  In addition to pitching in eight out of his thirteen Major League seasons, Callahan was a utility player who also played left field.

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Nixey Callahan (Library of Congress)


“Philadelphia Fillies,” by Del Reeves

In this 1970s song, Del Reeves manages to turn a list of Major League Baseball team names into a song about girls.  I took a moment to look up the word “filly,” which I somehow had never heard before.  It turns out that a filly is a young female horse — essentially the female version of a colt.


This day in baseball: Doubleheader streak

On September 15, 1928, the Boston Braves played their ninth consecutive doubleheader.  During the streak, which began on September 4th, the Braves lost five in a row, including four to the Giants.

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Boston Braves 1928 cap logo (sportslogos.net)


Infographic: MLB ticket prices by day of the week

I had considered treating myself to the Royals-Twins game this past Saturday — at least, up until I checked to see the price of tickets for that night’s game.  The chart below demonstrates my decision to stay in, rather than drive out to the ballpark.  By the time you factor in parking and food, a fan ends up relinquishing a good part of their paycheck to attend a Saturday ballgame.

This chart was actually created in 2010, but I’m sure we can all agree it’s still a pretty accurate depiction of trends in ticket prices today.

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Chad Burgress (seatgeek.com)


“We’re Human Beings,” by Jill McDonough

It’s easy to forget, sometimes, that the players we watch from the stands or from the comfort of our own homes are just as much flesh and blood and bone as we are.  Julio Lugo was certainly no stranger to criticism during his career, and admittedly, it was his own fault oftentimes.  The thing about being in the spotlight is that your mistakes get magnified ten-fold.  That doesn’t excuse them, of course, but I do still think it’s important for us as fans to remember that we all know folks in our own immediate lives who make the same kinds of mistakes, but are fortunate enough to not have a spotlight shone on them.

*

That’s why we’re here, said Julio Lugo
to the Globe. Sox fans booed
poor Lugo, booed his at-bat after
he dropped the ball in the pivotal fifth.

That ball, I got to it, I just
couldn’t come up with it.

Lugo wants you to know
he is fast: a slower player
wouldn’t even get close
enough to get booed. Lugo
wants you to know he’s only
human: We’re human beings.
That’s why we’re here. If not,

I would have wings.
I’d be beside God right now.
I’d be an angel.

But I’m not an angel.
I’m a human being that lives right here.

Next day, all
is forgiven. Lugo’s home run, Lugo’s
sweet comment to the press.

I wanted to make a poster like the ones that say
It’s my birthday! or First Time at Fenway! or, pathetic, ESPN.
Posterboard, permanent marker to say Lugo: me, too.
I’m a human being that lives right here
, decided
it’s too esoteric, too ephemeral a reference, but it’s true:
Oh, Lugo, Julio Lugo, I’m here with you.


This day in baseball

In the first game of a double-header on September 10, 1919, Cleveland right-hander Ray Caldwell no-hit the New York Yankees, 3-0.  After having been released by the Red Sox in July of that year, Caldwell won five of his six starts with the Indians, posting an ERA of 1.71.

 

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Ray Caldwell (sabr.org)