Creating plaques for the Baseball Hall of Fame

This video from 2015 is fascinating to watch.  What a job that must be for Matthews International, to have the privilege to make these plaques!  The Hall of Fame is already a treat to visit, but the story behind the creation of the plaques makes it all the more awe-inspiring.


Mariano Rivera’s Hall of Fame induction speech

As many of you already are aware, The Sandman, Mariano Rivera, was inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame a couple weekends ago.  I thoroughly enjoyed listening to his Hall of Fame induction speech.  What a humble guy.


This day in baseball: Clarke’s debut

Future Hall of Famer Fred Clarke made his major league debut on June 30, 1894.  Clarke went five-for-five for the Louisville Colonels, collecting four singles and a triple.

Fred_Clarke 1903

Fred Clarke in 1903 (Library of Congress)


“Headfirst Slide Into Cooperstown On A Bad Bet,” by Fall Out Boy

I debated whether or not to post this here, because in spite of its title, the song itself isn’t actually about baseball.  Rather, if you pay attention to the lyrics, you realize the song is about infidelity.

However, the title still grabs your attention if you’re a baseball fan, so I did a little poking around to see what I could find in terms of an explanation.  While there is some uncertainty about the general meaning, the consensus seems to be that the title is a reference to Pete Rose — in fact, some people indicate that Fall Out Boy originally included Rose’s name in the title, then changed their minds to avoid the potential for a lawsuit.  So instead of using his name, the band referenced Rose’s tendency to utilize headfirst slides.

Beyond that, the connection gets a bit hazy, but here’s what I found that makes a modicum of sense: In the song, the narrator is having an affair with a married woman.  He is the other man, if you will.  More than anything, he wants the woman for himself.  However, due to the fact that she is married (his bad bet), he can never have her.  In the same way, Pete Rose has found that he cannot have what he truly wants — a place in Cooperstown — due to his own bad bet.


Vin Scully’s Ford C. Frick Award acceptance speech

Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully received the Ford Frick Award from the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.  This video does a much better job of introducing him and describing Scully’s background than I ever could do in writing, so I’ll just let you hit play and take in his speech as well as the biographical bit that follows.


Earl Weaver’s Hall of Fame induction speech

I love this man’s sense of humor.  Earl Weaver managed in Major League Baseball for 17 years with the Baltimore Orioles (1968–82 and 1985–86).  He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1996.


Don Drysdale’s Hall of Fame induction speech

Don Drysdale emphasizes the strain and sacrifices that come with the demanding schedule of a professional ballplayer — especially on the side of that ballplayer’s family.  A right-handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers for his entire career, Drysdale won the 1962 Cy Young Award, and in 1968, he set a Major League record by pitching six consecutive shutouts and ​58 2⁄3 consecutive scoreless innings.  Drysdale ended his career with 209 wins, 2,486 strikeouts, 167 complete games and 49 shutouts. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.