Jackie Robinson, basketball player

Last year for Jackie Robinson Day, I took a closer look at Robinson’s career as a football player.  This year, I decided it would be fun to take a look at his career as a basketball player.  In addition to playing professional baseball and semi-professional football, I was impressed to learn that Robinson also played a season of professional basketball.

As many know, Jackie Robinson was, and remains to this day, the only four-sport varsity letterman in the history of UCLA, lettering in football, baseball, basketball, and track.  He played forward with the school’s basketball team and was a tremendous leaper, having also set the collegiate broad jump record.  In 1940 and 1941, Robinson led the Pacific Coast Conference Southern Division (now Pac-12) in scoring (12.4 average in 12 league games in 1940; 11.1 average in 12 league games in 1941).  In addition to his scoring, Robinson was known as a quick player with excellent ball handling skills.

After his basketball career at UCLA had ended in 1941, Robinson abandoned his senior year spring track season and left college to pursue outside athletic interests. After some time playing semi-professional football, Robinson found himself drafted into the Army as the United States entered World War II.  Following the war, Robinson joined the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues, eventually being signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers organization in 1946 to play for the club’s minor league franchise, the Montreal Royals.

After completing the season with Montreal, Robinson returned home to Pasadena, California.  In October 1946, Robinson signed a professional basketball contract with the Los Angeles Red Devils, a racially integrated professional basketball team.  The Red Devils only lasted two seasons, but with a lineup that included forwards Jackie Robinson, Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame member George Crowe, and Pasadena City College standout Irv Noren; guards Everett “Ziggy” Marcelle, a former Harlem Globetrotter, and USC All-American Eddie Oram; and Stanford star Art Stoefen at center, the team was a force to be reckoned with.

The Red Devils had been organized seeking to join the National Basketball League (NBL), which, in its merger talks with the NBA, wanted a West Coast franchise.  The team played home games at the Olympic Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles.  During the 1946-47 season, with Robinson on their roster, they crushed the Sheboygan Redskins of the NBL, on two occasions.  They also defeated the New York Renaissance, which had a lineup that included future New York City Basketball Hall of Fame member Clarence “Puggy” Bell and future NBA player Hank DeZonie.  Like the Sheboygan team, the Red Devils defeated the Renaissance twice.

Jackie Robinson left the Red Devils abruptly in January 1947.  At the time, few people understood why.  In retrospect, the reason becomes clear: Robinson parted ways with the Red Devils just after a Branch Rickey visit to Los Angeles.  A few months later, on April 15, 1947, Robinson made his Major League Baseball debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbetts Field and went on to be named the 1947 Rookie of the Year.

In spite of his success on the baseball diamond, basketball still reached out to Robinson from time to time.  Abe Saperstein offered Robinson a pro contract worth $10,000 with bonuses to play for the Harlem Globetrotters.  Though this amount was double what Robinson made with the Dodgers, he declined the offer.  He also received a pro basketball offer from the Canton Cushites, an all-black team that featured future Football Hall of Fame member Marion Motley and future Baseball Hall of Fame member Larry Doby.  Robinson declined that offer, also.

Though the Red Devils ultimately did not last, it does seem Robinson had some fond memories of his time with the team.  “There were some exceptionally good basketball players with name value on the squad,” he reminisced.  “We had, I think, a really fine team.”

Jackie Robinson basketball

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This day in baseball: YES network debut

The Yankees Entertainment and Sports Network (YES) made its debut on March 19, 2002.  As a team-owned network, YES would carry Yankees ball games as well as New Jersey Nets NBA games.

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