This day in baseball: Double fest

On July 21, 1921, the Yankees and the Indians hit a collective total of 21 doubles, establishing an American League record.  Cleveland collected nine of the two-baggers, defeating New York 17-8 at League Park.

League Park Cleveland

Wikipedia


Quote of the day

Somebody once asked me if I ever went up to the plate trying to hit a home run. I said, ‘Sure, every time.’

~Mickey Mantle

200px-Mickey_Mantle_1953

Wikimedia Commons


“The Beaning”: Horror Short Documentary

Over the weekend, I watched the latest movie iteration of It, and it prompted my curiosity to do a search of the phrase “baseball horror.”  I didn’t actually expect to find much, but much to my surprise, I found this little documentary (if you can call it that) that ALTER released earlier this year.

To be honest, I cannot say that I’m a particularly big fan of this short little spoof, though it does put forth a weirdly interesting theory.  The video proposes that the death of Ray Chapman as a result of being beaned in the head by Carl Mays was actually a form of occult human sacrifice.  The payoff of the sacrifice?  The rise of the New York Yankees as a baseball empire.

While I do agree with the video’s assertion that baseball can be a form of religion for some folks, the whole occult/human sacrifice bit seems a bit far-fetched to me.  But, here, you can judge for yourself.


Poem on Lou Gehrig’s trophy

gehrig

The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter

Shortly following Lou Gehrig’s retirement from baseball, due to his diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the Yankees declared July 4, 1939 “Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day.”  On this day, Gehrig delivered his now-historic “Luckiest Man” speech to the fans of Yankee Stadium.  During that ceremony, Gehrig’s teammates presented him with a trophy, and on that trophy they had the following poem, written by John Kiernan, engraved.

*

To LOU GEHRIG

We’ve been to the wars together;
We took our foes as they came;
And always you were the leader,
And ever you played the game.
Idol of cheering millions,
Records are yours by sheaves;
Iron of frame they hailed you
Decked you with laurel leaves.
But higher than that we hold you,
We who have known you best;
Knowing the way you came through
Every human test.
Let this be a silent token
Of lasting Friendship’s gleam,
And all that we’ve left unspoken;
Your Pals of the Yankees Team.


This day in baseball: Gehrig loses a home run

On April 26, 1931, with Lyn Lary as the runner on first base and two out in the inning, Yankee first baseman Lou Gehrig hit a home run at Griffith Stadium.  The homer cleared the centerfield fence, but then bounced back into the hands of Senators centerfielder Harry Rice.  Lary, thinking the ball had been caught, returned to the dugout without ever crossing home plate.  Gehrig, who had been running the bases with his head down, did not notice what happened and ended up getting called out for passing a runner on the base paths.

The incident ended up costing Gehrig the home run crown, as he and Babe Ruth finished the season tied with 46 homers a piece.

lou_gehrig


This day in baseball: Highlanders debut in New York

The New York Highlanders (later known as the Yankees) played their first game in as a New York City team on April 22, 1903. The Highlanders lost their opener to Washington, 3-1, at Hilltop Park in front of 11,950 fans. Pitcher Jack Chesbro took the loss, but he would finish the season with a 21-15 record (.583) and an ERA of 2.77.

Hilltop park 1903

Hilltop Park (Wikipedia)


Wally Pipp’s headache

Here’s a fun little comic by Molly Lawless about that moment when Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games streak began.  Whatever the story behind Pipp’s sitting out that day, you can’t help but feel for the guy.

wally pipp comic molly lawless