This day in baseball: Coveleski’s long start

On May 24, 1918, right-hander Stan Coveleski pitched 19 innings in the Indians’ 3-2 victory over the Yankees at the Polo Grounds.  Smoky Joe Wood hit a home run in the top of the 19th for the Tribe that proved to be the difference.  Coveleski gave up 12 hits and 6 walks with 4 strikeouts over the course of the game.

Stan_Coveleski_npcc_13989

Coveleski (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Palmer’s debut

Orioles pitcher Jim Palmer, aged nineteen, made his Major League debut on May 16, 1965 when he came on in relief to pitch 3.2 innings. The O’s defeated the Yankees, 7-2, and Palmer recorded his first major league win. To top it all off, Palmer also managed to hit a two-run home run off Yankees starting pitcher Jim Bouton in the fourth inning. Palmer would finish the season with a 5-4 record.

palmer


1958 Yankees Stars Sing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”

This was a lucky gem of a find.  In 1958, Yankees players Whitey Ford, Yogi Berra, Mickey Mantle, and Bill Skowron appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show along with Jack Norworth, writer of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.”  The group, along with the help of the crowd, sings the baseball anthem, followed up by a few questions from Mr. Sullivan.


This day in baseball

During an exhibition game against the University of Southern California on March 25, 1951, rookie Mickey Mantle hit a home run that traveled an estimated 650 feet. In addition to the monstrous homer, Mantle also collected a single, triple, and another homer.

mickey-mantle

likesuccess


This day in baseball: YES network debut

The Yankees Entertainment and Sports Network (YES) made its debut on March 19, 2002.  As a team-owned network, YES would carry Yankees ball games as well as New Jersey Nets NBA games.

yes-network


This day in baseball

With just three more wins needed to reach 300 total for his career, 43-year-old Gaylord Perry signed a one-year contract with the Seattle Mariners on March 5, 1982. Perry then earned his 300th win that May when he went the distance to beat New York at the Kingdome, 7-3.

gaylord perry

Getty Images


This day in baseball: Ruth’s 1927 deal

On March 2, 1927, the Yankees announced that Babe Ruth would earn $70,000 per season for the next three years, making him the highest paid player in major league history. The Bambino had asked for $100,000, but was negotiated down in a meeting with Colonel Jacob Ruppert, the club’s owner, at the Ruppert Brewery in Manhattan.

3-ruth-b1.jpg

New York Times