This day in baseball: Simmons’s consecutive games record

On July 20, 1926, outfielder Al Simmons of the A’s established an American League record by playing in 394 consecutive games to start his career. The record held until Hideki Matsui played in 518 straight games after signing as a Japanese free agent with the Yankees, surpassing Simmons’s mark in 2005.

Al_Simmons_(1937) - Wikipedia

Al Simmons, 1937 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Haas walks too many

On June 23, 1915, Bruno Haas of the Philadelphia Athletics pitched a complete game against the Yankees at Shibe Park. Haas lost the contest 15-7, however, giving up 16 walks over those 9 innings. It is a post-1900 record for a 9-inning game that stands to this day.

Records for most walks in a game are shown below, courtesy of Baseball Almanac.

Walks records - Baseball Almanac


This day in baseball: Dinneen’s no-hitters

On May 12, 1910, Athletics right-hander Chief Bender threw a 4-0 no-hitter at Shibe Park against the Cleveland Naps (Indians). Bender issued just one walk, spoiling his shot at a perfect game.

The home plate umpire for the game was Bill Dinneen, who tossed a no-hit game of his own against the White Sox while playing with the Pilgrims (Red Sox) on September 27, 1905. This performance by Chief Bender made Dinneen the only person in big league history to both throw a no-hitter and call one as an umpire. Dinneen served as home plate umpire for five total no-hitters in his career as an umpire.

1900_Bill_Dinneen.jpeg

Bill Dinneen (The Sporting News)


This day in baseball: Philadelphia A’s debut in the AL

On April 26, 1901 at Philadelphia’s Columbia Park, 10,547 fans witnessed Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics making their American League debut, losing to the Senators, 5-1. The Western League had been renamed the American League in 1900 by league president Ban Johnson and declared itself the second major league in 1901. Philadelphia’s new franchise, led by Mack, had been created to compete with the National League’s Philadelphia Phillies.

connie mack

National Baseball Hall of Fame Library/Major League Baseball/Getty Images


This day in baseball: Ruth’s first start

Babe Ruth made his first career start on the mound on March 25, 1914 for the Boston Red Sox. The 19-year-old pitcher defeated the world champion Philadelphia Athletics, 6-2, in an exhibition game played in Wilmington, North Carolina. Prior to this game, Ruth had faced 29 batters in relief, allowing just six hits, thus earning his spot in the starting rotation.

Babe Ruth pitching (Bleacher Report)


This day in baseball: AL marathon

The longest game in American League history (up to that point) took place on September 1, 1906. The Philadelphia Athletics defeated the Boston Red Sox in 24 innings, 4-1. The starter for both teams went the distance, as A’s hurler Jack Coombs beat Boston’s Joe Harris at Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds.

Huntington_Avenue_Grounds

Huntington Avenue Grounds (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Thompson’s MLB debut

Less than two weeks after Larry Doby’s debut with the Indians, Hank Thompson became the second black player to debut in the American League on July 17, 1947.¬† In the game, Thompson went 0-for-4 as the Browns suffered a 16-2 loss to Philadelphia at Sportsman’s Park. ¬†Thompson would play in only 27 games for St. Louis because his presence did not significantly raise attendance.

Hank Thompson

Hank Thompson (nlbm.mlbblogs.com)


Lost Baseball Teams

While this is far from a comprehensive collection of “lost” teams in baseball history, this short clip provides an interesting look at the St. Louis Browns, Boston Braves, and Philadelphia Athletics.¬† Being the number two team in your own city is never an easy position to overcome.


This day in baseball: Luis Castro’s major league debut

Luis Castro made his major league debut on April 23, 1902, making him the first player from Colombia to play in the big leagues.  Castro took the field at second base for Connie Mack’s Philadelphia’s A’s in an 8-1 victory over the Orioles at Oriole Park that day. The 25-year-old Medellin native would play in 42 games that year and would also prove to be the last player from Colombia to appear in major league baseball until Orlando Ramirez broke in with the Angels in 1974.

Luis Castro 1902

Castro in 1902 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Connie Mack passes

The legendary Connie Mack died on February 8, 1956 at the age of 93.  Mack had fallen and suffered a hip fracture a few months previously in October 1955, undergoing surgery on October 5 and missing the World Series that week for the first time ever.  He remained wheelchair-bound from that point on.  Officially, it was announced that Connie Mack died of “old age and complications from his hip surgery.”

connie mack

National Baseball Hall of Fame Library/Major League Baseball/Getty Images