This day in baseball: Connie Mack to the Brewers

On September 21, 1896, Connie Mack announced his intention to leave the Pirates in order to manage the minor-league Milwaukee Brewers of the Western League. Mack thus retired as a full-time player to accept his new role, which included a $3,000 a year salary and 25% ownership of the club. He managed the Brewers for four seasons from 1897 to 1900, their best year coming in 1900, when they finished second. 

ConnieMack1887

Connie Mack baseball card, 1887 (Wikimedia Commons)


This day in baseball: Youngest home run

The youngest player in MLB history to hit a home run was Tommy Brown of the Dodgers, who accomplished the feat on August 20, 1945. Brown was 17 years, eight months, and 14 days old on the day of the blast. The Brooklyn shortstop started his career as a 16-year-old high school student, and his homer proved to be the only run Brooklyn would score that day off the Pirates lefty, Preacher Roe. Roe pitched a complete game in the 11-1 rout of the Dodgers at Ebbets Field.


This day in baseball: Stargell elected to HoF

On January 12, 1988, Pirates slugger Willie Stargell was the only player elected to the Hall of Fame by the BBWAA.  Stargell helped bring two world championships to Pittsburgh and was the National League’s co-MVP in 1979, as well as the World Series MVP that same year.  Stargell was the 17th player to be elected to the Hall in his first year of eligibility.

Willie_Stargell_1979

Wikimedia Commons


This day in baseball: Cy Young’s final win

Cy Young pitched and recorded his 511th and final career victory on September 22, 1911, when he defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates.  Young kept the Pirates scoreless at Forbes Field, winning 1-0.   With a season record of 35-101, the Boston Rustlers won only three contests in 22 attempts against Pittsburgh during the 1911 season, with two of the victories coming as a result of shutouts thrown by the 44 year-old Cy Young.

cy_young_hof_plaque


This day in baseball: Kiner’s home run streak

On August 16, 1947, Ralph Kiner of the Pittsburgh Pirates hit three home runs in consecutive at-bats to lead the Pirates to a 12-7 win over the Cardinals. With this performance, Kiner matched the major league marks of seven home runs in four games, six in three games, five in two games, and four homers in consecutive at-bats.

Kiner Ralph

sabr.org


This day in baseball: Yde’s offensive show

On June 25, 1924, left-handed relief pitcher Emil Yde hit a double in the ninth inning to tie the score, 6-6, against the Cubs and send the game into extra innings.  Then, in the fourteenth inning, Yde hit a triple to lead the Pirates to an 8-7 victory.

Emil Yde

Emil Yde (Baseball Reference)


This day in baseball: Pittsburgh’s NL debut

The Pittsburgh Alleghenys, now known as the Pirates, played their first game in the National League on April 30, 1887, defeating the defending league-champion Chicago White Stockings, 6-2, at Pittsburgh’s Recreation Park. Formerly an American Association team the Alleghenys posted a 55-69 record in their first season, finishing in 6th place in the eight-team circuit.

1888_Pittsburg_Alleghenys

1888 Alleghenys


This day in baseball: World Series rookie dominance

On October 16, 1909, the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Tigers, 8-0, to win the World Series, four games to three.  Rookie pitcher Babe Adams hurled a complete-game shutout in Game Seven, having also won Games One and Five.

Babeadamsbaseballcard


This day in baseball: Sole victory

Chicago Colts (Cubs) pitcher Dave Wright won the only game of his major league career on September 28, 1897 (out of two total pitching appearances).  The twenty-one-year-old gave up 14 runs on 17 hits, yet he still managed to eek out a 15-14 victory over the Pirates.

David William Wright in Twin City uniform

Dave Wright (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Triple king

At Forbes Field on August 26, 1912, Owen “Chief” Wilson hit three triples in a doubleheader against the Braves.  The Pirates outfielder’s third triple of the twin bill established a new major league record for triples in a season with 32, breaking the mark he shared with Dave Orr (1886 Metropolitans/AA) and Heinie Reitz (1894 Orioles/NL).  Wilson finished the season with 36 three-baggers, a record that stands to this day.

1912 Owen Chief Wilson

Wikipedia