This day in baseball: Rogers Hornsby traded to Boston

Rogers Hornsby was traded from the New York Giants to the Boston Braves on January 10, 1928. Giants owner Charles Stoneham had grown weary of Hornsby’s abrasive manner and gambling habits, and opted to trade Hornsby for catching prospect Shanty Hogan and outfielder Jimmy Welsh. During Hornsby’s season in Boston, he led the major leagues in hitting with a .387 batting average plus a .498 on-base-percentage, all while managing the club.

Rogers_Hornsby_1928

Rogers Hornsby (TIME Magazine cover, 9 July 1928)


This day in baseball: Charles Ebbets becomes president of the Dodgers

In the wake of the death of Charles H. Byrne, team secretary Charles Ebbets became president of the Bridegrooms (Dodgers) on January 4, 1898. The team’s future owner also managed the Brooklyn team for the last 110 games of the season, finishing tenth among the twelve teams of the National League.

Charles Ebbets, c. 1915 - Wikipedia

Charles Ebbets, c. 1915 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Buddy Lewis awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross

Senators third baseman Buddy Lewis was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross on December 28, 1944 for his service in the China Burma India Theater. During World War II, Lewis flew more than 500 missions for the U.S. Army Air Forces as a transport pilot. Lewis was released by the Army on July 20, 1945 and would return to baseball a week later.

Buddy_Lewis_1939 - Wikipedia

Buddy Lewis, 1939 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Moises Alou signs with the Giants

On December 27, 2004, the San Francisco Giants signed free-agent outfielder Moises Alou to a one-year contract with an option for a second year. The Cubs refused to offer arbitration and let Alou go following the 2004 season, citing numerous fights with umpires. Alou’s signing with San Francisco marked the second time he would be managed by his father, Felipe, who was also his skipper when playing with the Expos from 1992-1996.

Moises_Alou 2005 - Wikipedia

Moises Alou, 2005 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Tris Speaker and Ty Cobb cleared by Landis

On December 21, 1926, Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis dismissed a claim by Dutch Leonard alleging that Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker bet on a fixed game six years previous. The commissioner declared the matter closed, clearing both Speaker and Cobb of any wrongdoing when Leonard did not show up at a hearing to defend his accusations.

Landis_portrait-restored

Kenesaw Mountain Landis


This day in baseball: A DH proposal

In an effort to speed up the game and add more offense, on December 11, 1928, National League president John Heydler proposed instituting a designated batter for the pitcher. The American League oppose the idea, however, and the NL withdrew the proposal before it could get to Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis to break the deadlock.

John Heydler 1918 - The Sporting News

John Heydler, 1918 (The Sporting News)


This day in baseball: Billy Williams is Rookie of the Year

On November 30, 1961, Billy Williams of the Chicago Cubs was selected as the National League Rookie of the Year by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. The outfielder hit 25 home runs and drove in 86 runs that year, and was selected on 10 of the 16 ballots cast by the writers. The runner-up in the voting, Braves catcher Joe Torre, received five votes from the writers.

Billy_Williams_1969 - Wikipedia

Billy Williams in 1969 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Joe Mauer named AL MVP

Joe Mauer was named Most Valuable Player for the American League on November 23, 2009. In spite of missing the first month of the season with a back injury, Mauer received 27 of 28 first place votes from the BBWAA to become the fifth Twin in history to earn MVP honors.

Joe Mauer in 2008 - Wikipedia

Joe Mauer in 2008 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: The Alleghenys jump to the National League

The Pittsburgh Alleghenys left the American Association on November 18, 1886 to join the National League as an expansion team. In 1891, the Pittsburgh team would become known as the Pirates, a name derived from an incident involving the franchise accused of being “piratical” for taking players from rival teams in other leagues.

mlb.com

This day in baseball: Waitkus is Comeback Player of the Year

Seventeen months after being shot in the chest with a rifle by an obsessed fan, Eddie Waitkus was named the Comeback Player of the Year by the Associated Press on November 10, 1950. The Phillies’ infielder hit .284 that season and led the team with 102 runs scored, as he continued to be one of the best fielding first basemen in the league.

Waitkus’s story would provide part of the inspiration for Bernard Malamud’s The Natural, published in 1952.

Eddie_Waitkus - Wikipedia

Wikipedia