This day in baseball: RIP Ross Youngs

New York Giants rightfielder Ross Youngs passed away on October 22, 1927 of Brights disease.  The future Hall of Famer had a career batting average of .322, having batted over .300 for seven straight seasons, including reaching an average of more than .350 twice.  Youngs was also one of John McGraw’s favorite players, who said at Youngs’s funeral, “The game was never over with Youngs until the last man was out.  He could do everything a ball player should do, and do it better than most players.  As an outfielder he had no superiors, and he was the easiest man I ever knew to handle.  In all his years with the Giants, he never caused one minute’s trouble for myself or the club.  On top of all this, a gamer ballplayer than Youngs never played ball.”

Ross Youngs New York Giants


This day in baseball: World Series rookie dominance

On October 16, 1909, the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Tigers, 8-0, to win the World Series, four games to three.  Rookie pitcher Babe Adams hurled a complete-game shutout in Game Seven, having also won Games One and Five.

Babeadamsbaseballcard


This day in baseball: First World Series sweep

The Boston Braves completed the first World Series sweep in baseball history on October 13, 1914.  The Braves defeated the Philadelphia Athletics, 3-1, to win the Series, four games to none.

1914_Boston_Braves

1914 Boston Braves (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball

On October 9, 1894, Jack Manning of the Philadelphia Quakers (Phillies) became the first player in franchise history to hit three home runs in a single game.  The outfielder accomplished the feat in an 11-7 loss to the White Stockings at Chicago’s Lake Front Park.

Jack_Manning

Jack Manning (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: POTUS’s first World Series

At Griffith Stadium on October 4, 1924, Calvin Coolidge became the first United States President to attend a World Series opener.  The Giants managed to defeat the hometown Senators in 12 innings that day, with a score of 4-3.

baseball-collidge-flag

President Calvin Coolidge and First Lady Grace Coolidge at a baseball game with Coolidge’s secretary C. Bascom Slemp at right, 1924 (Library of Congress)


This day in baseball: Sole victory

Chicago Colts (Cubs) pitcher Dave Wright won the only game of his major league career on September 28, 1897 (out of two total pitching appearances).  The twenty-one-year-old gave up 14 runs on 17 hits, yet he still managed to eek out a 15-14 victory over the Pirates.

David William Wright in Twin City uniform

Dave Wright (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: New high score

The Brooklyn Superbas established a new franchise record for runs scored in a game on September 23, 1901.  In a game played at League Park in Cincinnati, Brooklyn scored 11 times in the fifth inning, blowing out the Reds, 25-6.

League Park Cincinnati

League Park (thedeadballera.com)