This day in baseball: High-hit shutout

In the second game of a doubleheader on August 12, 1921, the Phillies’ right-handed pitcher George Smith gave up 12 hits, and yet he still managed to pitch a shutout against the Boston Braves, winning 4-0.  Smith had also started the first game of the doubleheader, but in that game, he gave up three runs on four hits and was taken out in the second inning.

george smith

Baseball Reference


This day in baseball: Johnson’s first win

Walter Johnson won his first major league game on August 7, 1907.  At the age of 19, Johnson led the Senators to a 7-2 victory over the Indians. He would go on to compile a 417-279 (.599) record during his 21-year career, with an ERA of 2.17.

walter johnson


This day in baseball: Twenty-one hits

On July 30, 1917, the Tigers collected twenty-one hits en route to a 16-4 rout of Washington.  Ty Cobb, Bobby Veach, and Ossie Vitt, who were batting second, third, and fourth in the order, respectively, each came up with a 5-for-5 day at the plate.

Bobby_Veach_1925

Bobby Veach (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Cy Young’s last minor league game

The last minor league appearance of Cy Young’s career took place on July 25, 1890.  In the game against McKeesport (Pennsylvania), the 23-year-old Young threw a no-hitter, striking out 18 batters in the process.

1899_Cy_Young

Cy Young in 1899 (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Hendrick the hero

On July 21, 1930, Harvey Hendrick of the Brooklyn Robins entered the game as a pinch hitter in the ninth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals.  He hit a three-run homer to give the Robins a dramatic 9-8 come-from-behind victory at Ebbets Field in the first game of a double-header.

Harvey Hendrick

Hendrick (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Rookie no-hitter

Christy Mathewson became the first rookie in the modern era to throw a no-hitter on July 15, 1901.  Just twenty years old, the right-hander kept the Cardinals hitless as the Giants posted a 5-0 victory at Robison Field in St. Louis.

Robison Field (digitalballparks.com)


This day in baseball: Inside-the-park x3

On July 12, 1897, Louisville outfielder Tom McCreery hit three home runs off Philadelphia right-hander Jack Taylor.  The three four-baggers provided the difference in the Colonels’ 10-7 victory over the Phillies at the Baker Bowl. Each of the outfielder’s round-trippers were inside-the-park home runs, which makes me wonder about Philadelphia’s defense.

Tom_McCreery

Tom McCreery (Wikipedia)