This day in baseball: 1957 NL pennant

Thanks to Hank Aaron’s 11th inning home run, the Milwaukee Braves defeated the Cardinals 4-2 to clinch the 1957 National League pennant.  It was the first time since the 1950 season that a team not from New York state finished first in the National League.  From 1951 to 1956, NL pennants were split between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants.

 

Hank_Aaron_1960

Hank Aaron (Baseball Digest)

 


This day in baseball

Jim ‘Nixey’ Callahan threw the White Sox’s first no-hitter in franchise history on September 20, 1902, defeating the Tigers, 2-0.  In addition to pitching in eight out of his thirteen Major League seasons, Callahan was a utility player who also played left field.

Nixey_Callahan

Nixey Callahan (Library of Congress)


This day in baseball: Doubleheader streak

On September 15, 1928, the Boston Braves played their ninth consecutive doubleheader.  During the streak, which began on September 4th, the Braves lost five in a row, including four to the Giants.

boston_braves-cap-1928

Boston Braves 1928 cap logo (sportslogos.net)


This day in baseball

In the first game of a double-header on September 10, 1919, Cleveland right-hander Ray Caldwell no-hit the New York Yankees, 3-0.  After having been released by the Red Sox in July of that year, Caldwell won five of his six starts with the Indians, posting an ERA of 1.71.

 

Caldwell-Ray-LOC

Ray Caldwell (sabr.org)

 


This day in baseball

Elmer Smith of the Indians collected seven extra-base hits in just two days, establishing a Major League record on September 5, 1921.  The streak of hits included four home runs and three doubles in the two days.

elmer smith

Elmer Smith (Library of Congress)

 


This day in baseball

Chicago pitcher Ed Walsh, Sr. no-hit the Red Sox, 5-0, on August 27, 1911 at Comiskey Park.  Walsh was particularly known for his use of the spitball.  According to Hall of Famer Sam Crawford: “Big Ed Walsh. Great big, strong, good-looking fellow. He threw a spitball. I think that ball disintegrated on the way to the plate, and the catcher put it back together again. I swear, when it went past the plate, it was just the spit went by.”

 

Ed_walsh

Wikipedia

 


This day in baseball

On August 19, 1900, Milwaukee pitcher Rube Waddell pitched two complete games in both contests of a doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox.  He threw 17 innings in the first game, then was coaxed (with a promise of a few days off to go fishing) by manager Connie Mack to pitch the nightcap, in which Waddell threw a five-inning one-hitter.  Milwaukee won both games, 2-1 and 1-0.

 

WaddellRubePlaque182_NB

National Baseball Hall of Fame