This day in baseball: Braves looking to move

Lou Perini announced on March 13, 1953 that he would be seeking permission from the National League to move his franchise from Boston to Milwaukee. The Braves owner pointed to poor attendance as the reason for wanting to relocate the club. This date would come to be known as “Black Friday” in Boston.

Perini Louis 7074.92_FL_NBL

Perini (SABR)


Backwards bases

On June 23, 1963, Mets outfielder Jimmy Piersall faced Phillies pitcher Dallas Green to lead off the top of the fifth. Piersall swung on Green’s offering and blasted what was career homer number 100.

To celebrate the milestone, Piersall then decided to take Duke Snider up on his clubhouse bet and ran around the bases backward.  He completed his trip around the bases in the correct order: first, second, third, and home — he just faced backwards.  Piersall essentially backpedaled all the way around the infield.

Jimmy Piersall backwards

complex.com


This day in baseball: Federal League founded

On March 8, 1913, John Powers founded the Federal League.  Just a year previous, Powers had the Columbian League, which had failed before a game could even be played.  The new Federal League established teams in Chicago, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, St. Louis, and Covington, Kentucky.  The league did not abide by the National Agreement, earning it the nickname the “outlaw league,” which allowed it to recruit players from established clubs.

Federal_League_logo

Federal League logo (Wikipedia)


This day in baseball: Dodger car accident

Attempting to beat a 12:30 a.m. curfew on March 5, 1958, the Dodgers’ Duke Snider, Johnny Podres, and Don Zimmer sustained minor injuries in a car accident in Vero Beach, Florida.  This automobile mishap was the third involving the Dodgers within the last two months, with prior crashes involving Roy Campanella and Jim Gilliam.

Snider Podres Zimmer auto accident


This day in baseball: Olerud’s surgery

After collapsing on January 11th following a workout, John Olerud underwent brain surgery for the removal of an aneurysm on February 27, 1989. Olerud, a left-handed first baseman at Washington State University, went on to be the Blue Jays’ third round pick in the June Amateur Draft.

john olerud

blogspot.com


This day in baseball: Boggs’s arbitration case

In spite of losing his arbitration case on February 23, 1986, third baseman Wade Boggs was still awarded $1.35 million, which was the highest amount ever awarded as a result of the process.  The amount was a half million less than the $1.85 million Boggs was seeking from the Boston Red Sox.

Wade Boggs

Getty Images


This day in baseball: Cox buys the Phillies

After the bankrupt team had been taken over by the National League, William D. Cox purchased the Philadelphia Phillies from the NL on February 18, 1943.  At the age of 33, this made Cox the youngest owner in the league.  However, evidence surfaced later that year that Cox had placed some bets on his own team.  Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis launched an investigation, and Cox eventually admitted to making some “sentimental” bets on the Phillies.  Landis responded by banning Cox from baseball on November 23, 1943.

Connie Mack Stadium - Shibe Park

Shibe Park (Wikipedia)