Bud Selig Is “Comfortable”

Bud Selig is down to his last handful of days as commissioner of baseball.  Selig took over baseball as chairman of the executive council in 1992, following Fay Vincent’s resignation. Though he insisted that he would never take the job permanently, Selig was elected commissioner in 1998 and will have been in charge of baseball for the second-longest term in baseball history. Only Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who held the job from 1920 to 1944, was commissioner longer.  On Sunday, January 25, Rob Manfred will take over as the new commissioner of baseball, thus ending Selig’s long run.


Footage from the 1924 World Series

Here’s a tremendous find that the Library of Congress recently recovered.  Found in the garage of an estate, eight cans of nitrate film were discovered to be in near-perfect condition.  The contents of the film?  Nearly forty minutes of Game 7 of the 1924 World Series, in which the Washington Senators defeated the New York Giants 4-3 in twelve innings.

If you would like the read the story from the Washington Post, click here.  As an added bonus, Keith Olbermann took the liberty of broadcasting the game’s highlights, complete with commentary:


Derek Jeter Isn’t The Greatest Player Ever

The entirety of this season seems to have been engulfed by Derek Jeter farewell ceremonies, to which I have only paid half-attention.  While I do think that Jeter is a phenomenal ballplayer, deserving of his place in the Hall of Fame, I think I have to agree with Mr. Olbermann on this one: this season-long farewell tribute is a bit ridiculous.  On that note, this video also provides a bunch of interesting statistics and Yankees history, in support of Olbermann’s statement.


Why Nobody Watches the World Series

One of my favorite television political and sports commentators is Keith Olbermann, who also happens to be a baseball junkie.  A few nights ago, on his ESPN2 show “Olbermann” (original name, I know), he did a commentary on why baseball has experienced such a decline in viewership over the years.

Blunt and direct, which is what I like about Olbermann.  Still, the information he presents is rather sobering, isn’t it?