“Cubs in Five,” The Mountain Goats

The Chicago Cubs went so long between World Series championships that, even after finally winning one, the pop culture references to their dry spell continue to haunt.  This song is an example of just that.  You know you’ve had a rough time of things when the likelihood of your winning again gets compared to the likelihood of the Canterbury Tales becoming a bestseller.


Quote of the day

I’ve fallen in love with baseball.

~Nick Jonas

Nick Jonas baseball

fanpop


“Batter Up,” by Brand New

Here’s a song that isn’t really about baseball, though it has some baseball allusions in it.  I see this as a song about taking chances, though I have found some other interpretations about it, too.  The tune is rather melancholy, but I also find it quite calming.


“Hardball,” Lil Bow Wow/Lil’ Wayne/Lil’ Zane/Sammie

This is not my usual preferred genre when it comes to music, but I have to admit that this tune is pretty catchy.  Baseball is so versatile when it comes to pop culture.


“Baseball Blues,” Claire Hamill

No baseball shoes?  You’re not alone.  As this song demonstrates, a lack of baseball shoes can be almost traumatic for some folks.


“Baseball,” by Michael Franks

I know the phrase “smooth as butter” is incredibly cliché, but that is the only way I can describe the sound of this song.  This is the kind of tune that makes a person want to lean back on the stool at the bar and order a whiskey neat.


Cal Ripken in rap

Today marks twenty-four years since Cal Ripken, Jr. set a new major league record by playing in his 2,131st consecutive baseball game (September 6, 1995), breaking the record previously held by Lou Gehrig.  In honor of the anniversary, the Baltimore Sun published a piece that features clips from a long list of rap songs (over 50 total) that mention Ripken in them.  I don’t often think of rap when I think of baseball, but I suppose when you make a mark like the one Cal made, rappers are going to notice you.

Check out the piece here.

Cal_Ripken,_Jr_in_1996

Cal Ripken, Jr in 1996 (by Joe Shlabotnik)