This day in baseball: Charles Stoneham dies

Charles Stoneham, the owner of the New York Giants baseball team, passed away on January 6, 1936.  Stoneham was the last remaining owner of the trio (along with John McGraw and Frank McQuade) that purchased the team in 1919.  He passed the team on to his son, Horace Stoneham, upon his death.  During his time as owner, Stoneham saw the Giants win the World Series in 1921, 1922 and 1933.

Frank McQuade - Charles Stoneham - John McGraw

sabr.org


This day in baseball: Carl Mays sold to Reds

Yankees submarine pitcher Carl Mays was sold to the Reds for $85,000 on December 23, 1923.  Mays had a personality that tended to clash with most people, and he never really got along with manager Miller Huggins in New York.  Mays would go 49-34 in Cincinnati before ending his career with the New York Giants.

Carl Mays

sabr.org


This day in baseball: A Series of shutouts

The 1905 World Series was the only World Series in history in which every game ended as a shutout.  Game 5 of the Series, played on October 14th, featured Christy Mathewson of New York against Chief Bender of Philadelphia on the mound.  Mathewson defeated the A’s 2-0,  marking his third victory of the Series to secure the Giants’ World Series victory.

Christy_Mathewson_Baseball

Christy Mathewson (Chicago Historical Society)


This day in baseball: Lavender stumps the Giants

In the first game of a doubleheader on August 31, 1915, Cubs pitcher Jimmy Lavender threw a no-hitter against the New York Giants, a 2–0 victory. He struck out eight batters and walked just one. On June 14 of the following year, again against the Giants, Lavender pitched a one-hitter, allowing only an infield single to Benny Kauff.

Jimmy Lavender 1912

Jimmy Lavender, 1912 (Library of Congress)


This day in baseball: Welch wins 300

Pitcher Mickey Welch of the New York Giants reached the 300-victory milestone on July 28, 1890, making him the third pitcher in baseball history to reach the mark.  Welch defeated Pittsburgh 4-2 that day, and would go on to record seven more victories before retiring from the game.

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National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum


Arlie Latham

Arlie_Latham

Wikipedia

Nicknamed “The Freshest Man On Earth,” Walter Arlington Latham was born March 15, 1860 in West Lebanon, New Hampshire. Latham’s father served as a bugler for the Union Army in the American Civil War, and at the conclusion of the war, young Arlie became interested in baseball when soldiers returning from the battlefield brought the game home with them.

By the time he was fourteen, Latham had become good enough to play with the General Worth nine, a local team in Stoneham, Massachusetts, where the family had moved. Latham started out as a catcher, but later took up playing third base to avoid getting beat up behind the plate.  In 1877, Latham played with the Pittsfield, Massachusetts club as their third baseman, and then in 1879, he made his professional debut in minor league baseball with Springfield in the National Association.

Twenty-year-old Latham made his Major League debut on July 5, 1880 with the Buffalo Bisons of the National League, becoming the first man from New Hampshire to play in the majors. He then played for the Philadelphia Athletics of the National Association in 1881, then the Philadelphia Phillies of the League Alliance in 1882.

Latham then joined the St. Louis Browns of the American Association in 1883. He stayed in St. Louis through the 1889 season, during which time the Browns won four consecutive pennants (1885-1888) in the American Association. Latham led the AA in runs scored with 152 during the 1886 season. He also batted .316 and stole 142 bases, then tacked on another 12 stolen bases in the playoffs. Adding to a reputation as an excellent base stealer, in 1887, Latham stole 129 bases, and he also led the league in stolen bases with 109 during the 1888 season.

In 1890, Latham jumped to the Chicago Pirates of the Players’ League. Later that year, in July, he returned to the NL with the Cincinnati Reds, where he served as a utility player and coach. Latham played for Cincinnati through 1895, then was traded to the Browns after the 1895 season. The Browns then released Latham after the 1896 season. Latham bounced around the minors for a few years before winding up with the Washington Senators in 1899. He later made four appearances for the New York Giants in 1909 at age 49.

Personality-wise, Arlie Latham was considered one of the funniest players in baseball. I’m not sure exactly how he earned the nickname “The Freshest Man on Earth,” but Latham was well-known for playing practical jokes. According to one account, the existence of the third base coach’s box is thanks to Latham. He would taunt opposing players third base coach, taking advantage of the lack of a coach’s box by running up and down the third base line yelling insults at the pitcher while he was in the middle of his windup.

His tendency to shout and gesticulate, not only as a coach, but also as a player, earned Latham the unofficial title of “the father of ‘chatter’.” The implication, of course, being that the practice of infield chatter that exists to this day had begun with Arlie Latham.

Latham finished his playing career with 742 stolen bases in seventeen professional seasons with a .269 batting average, .334 OBP, and .341 slugging. Latham died on November 29, 1952 at the age of 92 in Garden City, New York. He is buried in Greenfield Cemetery in Uniondale, New York.


This day in baseball: First professional team at the White House

The first professional sports team to visit the White House was the Forest Cities ball club, a recently defunct franchise of the National Association, brought to Washington, D.C. by President Chester A. Arthur on April 13, 1883.  Later in the season, President Arthur also hosted the new National League’s New York Gothams (who would become known as the Giants in 1885).

Chester Arthur

Chester A. Arthur (Wikipedia)