This day in baseball

In a game against the Red Sox on July 22, 1909, Detroit’s Ty Cobb stole three bases in a single inning.  This feat, occurring at Huntington Grounds in Boston, helped give the Tigers a 6-0 victory.

BaseballLibrary.com


Quote of the day

If you’re going to play at all, you’re out to win. Baseball, board games, playing Jeopardy, I hate to lose.

~Derek Jeter

Derek Jeter

Wikimedia Commons


This day in baseball

On July 19, 1933, Rick and Wes Ferrell became the first set of brothers to hit home runs in the same game playing on opposing teams.  Rick’s homer came off a pitch thrown by his brother.

Rick Ferrell (left) and Wes Ferrell (Sports Illustrated)


“Where I’m From,” by Michael Kumar

Here’s a piece written by a high school ballplayer, Michael Kumar.  I can’t help but love this piece, if only because I played center field for my high school softball team.  It’s a fun position — you’ve gotta have speed, a strong, accurate throwing arm, and the ability to lead.

~*~

I am from center field,
From where the rich green grass and the warm brown dirt meet.
I am from the place where champions are made, and
legends are born.
I am from the drive to succeed and the fear of failure.

I am from where players made footsteps too deep to fill,
From the same turf legends and DiMaggio and Mantle, and where The Say Hey Kid
made his famous catch.
I am from the roar of the fans and the chatter of my teammates.

I’m from the place where I feel comfortable, and I am determined to stay here.
I’m from the place where left meets right and I am ready.
I am home.


This day in baseball: King Karl

On July 17, 1936, Giants pitcher Carl Hubbell achieved a 6-0 victory over the Pirates.  This became the first of a 24-game winning streak for Hubbell, who would not lose a game until Memorial Day of 1937.  Hubbell’s consecutive game winning streak record continues to stand today.

Wikimedia Commons


Quote of the day

Baseball is a team game but, at the same time, it’s a very lonely game: unlike in soccer or basketball, where players roam around, in baseball everyone has their little plot of the field to tend. When the action comes to you, the spotlight is on you but no one can help you.

~Chad Harbach

Wikimedia Commons


“Take Me Out to the Ballgame” (1908 version), by Jack Norworth

First published in 1908, vaudeville entertainer/songwriter Jack Norworth’s “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” has become well-known as the game’s anthem.  Many people do not realize, however, that the full song actually describes a young lady who, crazy about baseball, insists to her guy that if he wants to take her out, it had better be to a ballgame.  Now that’s my kind of gal!

*

Katie Casey was base ball mad.
Had the fever and had it bad;
Just to root for the home town crew,
Ev’ry sou Katie blew.
On a Saturday, her young beau
Called to see if she’d like to go,
To see a show but Miss Kate said,
“No, I’ll tell you what you can do.”

“Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack,
I don’t care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don’t win it’s a shame.
For it’s one, two, three strikes, you’re out,
At the old ball game.”

Katie Casey saw all the games,
Knew the players by their first names;
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Katie Casey knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song:

“Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack,
I don’t care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don’t win it’s a shame.
For it’s one, two, three strikes, you’re out,
At the old ball game.”