Early baseball poem

This piece was published in the short-lived National Daily Baseball Gazette on April 20, 1887, and it is believed to be among the first-ever poems inspired by the game of baseball.  I wasn’t able to find a title nor an author for the piece, but it is interesting to read, including the note about butterfingers.

*

Then dress, then dress, brave gallants all,
Don uniforms amain;
Remember fame and honor call
Us to the field again.
No shrewish tears shall fill our eye
When the ball club’s in our hand,
If we do lose we wil not sigh,
Nor plead a butter* hand.
Let piping swain and craven jay
Thus weep and puling cry,
Our business is like men to play,
Or know the reason why.

*Hence the term “butter-fingers,” which, twenty years ago, was applied to a man or a boy who didn’t hold a ball.


2 Comments on “Early baseball poem”

  1. verdun2 says:

    Bad Bill Shakespeare is in no danger of being overtaken. 🙂
    That said by someone who couldn’t write one as well as the one above. Oh, well.
    v


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