Creating plaques for the Baseball Hall of Fame

This video from 2015 is fascinating to watch.  What a job that must be for Matthews International, to have the privilege to make these plaques!  The Hall of Fame is already a treat to visit, but the story behind the creation of the plaques makes it all the more awe-inspiring.


Nokona baseball gloves

This little documentary is less than seven minutes long, and it is a fun watch.  Not only do you learn some things about Nokona baseball gloves, you get to watch the process of a ball glove getting made.  And I love the fact that the work shirts worn by Nokona employees are baseball jerseys.


Infographic: How to Dress to Play Baseball

This infographic is obviously intended more for amusement and sales promotion than anything else, but one might find some useful tips listed all the same.  What I’d really like to find is a graphic on how to dress as a baseball fan attending a game as a spectator.  I’ve seen Royals fans show up to a game against the White Sox in gray or black t-shirts — not that this is a crime, but it makes it confusing for anyone to know who you’re really rooting for.

how-to-dress-to-play-baseball infographic


Road grays

When you turn on a Major League Baseball game, you can often tell within moments which team is the home team and which is the away team.  The common practice by teams in the MLB is to wear white (or mostly white) uniforms at home and to wear gray (or mostly gray) unis when on the road.

While this is a regular exercise now, baseball legend has it that this tradition began due to the fact that visiting teams had no access to laundry facilities, and so the players were not able to clean their uniforms. The darker uniforms, or the “road grays,” could conceal the dirt and grass stains better than white uniforms.

Not every team does this today, of course.  And given better access to laundry facilities, they don’t need to.  But it’s an interesting story and practice, all the same.

Road jerseys gray


Baseball 101: The closer

A couple days ago, a baseball neophyte friend of mine asked me, “In baseball, what is a closer?”  And as I explained the concept, it occurred to me that I haven’t done one of these posts in awhile.

In baseball, a closing pitcher, more commonly referred to as a closer, is a relief pitcher who typically enters the game in the final inning.  Ideally, the closer’s team will be leading on the scoreboard at that point, and so the closer’s job is to “close” the game, getting the final outs of that final inning.

A closer’s effectiveness has traditionally been measured by the number of saves he earns.  A save is a statistic credited to a relief pitcher, as set forth in Rule 9.19 of the Official Rules of Major League Baseball.  The rule states that the official scorer shall credit a pitcher with a save when that pitcher meets all four of the following conditions:

  1. He is the finishing pitcher in a game won by his team;
  2. He is not the winning pitcher;
  3. He is credited with at least ⅓ of an inning pitched; and
  4. He satisfies one of the following conditions:
    1. He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least one inning
    2. He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, at bat or on deck
    3. He pitches for at least three innings.

Over time, closers have become one-inning specialists typically brought in at the beginning of the ninth inning in save situations.  They enter the game facing the high pressure that comes with having to seal those last three outs and, thus, a win for their club, which makes their role a rather essential one to a team’s success.

Mariano Rivera is MLB’s all-time leader in regular season saves with 652.

Mariano Rivera

Mariano Rivera


Distance run per game per sport

I don’t think it comes as a surprise that baseball involves the least amount of running of any of these.  I am a bit surprised that a tennis match requires more running than a basketball game.  It looks like the original data came from Runner’s World, though I suppose it would be unfair to include the distance of a marathon in this chart.

Distance run per sport

the18.com


Infographic: Staying Safe at the Plate

This infographic is clearly intended for current ballplayers, though even as a fan and spectator, this is some good information.  I actually didn’t know “batter’s shoulder” was a thing, but now I’m going to wince every time I see a hitter stop his or her swing.

Baseball-Injury-Prevention-Infographic

alanehogan.com