This day in baseball: Sandberg becomes baseball’s highest paid player

Ryne Sandberg became the highest paid player in baseball when he signed a four-year contract extension worth $28.4 million with the Chicago Cubs on March 2, 1992.  The contract eclipsed Bobby Bonilla’s five-year, $29 million contract with the Mets, signed just three months previous.  Sandberg never got to enjoy the full sum promised by this contract, however, as he unexpectedly retired during the 1994 season, walking away from nearly $15.8 million of the record deal.

Ryne Sandberg Sports Illustrated


“Land of Wrigley,” Stormy Weather

This piece is short and sweet, and the acapella is impressive.  Enjoy this nice little doo wop piece to start your weekend!


This day in baseball: Joe Tinker traded to the Reds

On December 15, 1912, the Chicago Cubs traded Joe Tinker, as well as Harry Chapman and Grover Lowdermilk, to the Cincinnati Reds for Red Corriden, Bert Humphries, Pete Knisely, Mike Mitchell, and Art Phelan.  Tinker, who had been canonized in Franklin Pierce Adams’ baseball poem “Tinker to Evers to Chance,” went on to serve as the player-manager for Cincinnati.

1912 Joe Tinker baseball card

1912 Joe Tinker baseball card (Wikipedia)


“All the Way,” Eddie Vedder

Here’s an awesome tribute to the Chicago Cubs by Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder.  The accompanying video was originally produced in 2008, during the team’s playoff stint.


“Cubs in Five,” The Mountain Goats

The Chicago Cubs went so long between World Series championships that, even after finally winning one, the pop culture references to their dry spell continue to haunt.  This song is an example of just that.  You know you’ve had a rough time of things when the likelihood of your winning again gets compared to the likelihood of the Canterbury Tales becoming a bestseller.


This day in baseball: Mr. Cub is MVP again

Ernie Banks won his second consecutive MVP award on November 4, 1959.  Mr. Cub finished the season with a .304 batting average and 143 RBIs, including 45 home runs.  Banks collected ten of the writers’ 21 first-place votes, with Eddie Mathews (5) and Hank Aaron (2) of the Braves and Dodger Wally Moon (4) dividing the rest of the first-place votes.

Ernie_Banks_1955_Bowman_card


This day in baseball: Lavender stumps the Giants

In the first game of a doubleheader on August 31, 1915, Cubs pitcher Jimmy Lavender threw a no-hitter against the New York Giants, a 2–0 victory. He struck out eight batters and walked just one. On June 14 of the following year, again against the Giants, Lavender pitched a one-hitter, allowing only an infield single to Benny Kauff.

Jimmy Lavender 1912

Jimmy Lavender, 1912 (Library of Congress)