Infographic: 14 Things You Didn’t Know About the World Series

I can’t seem to trace the origins of this infographic, but I found it an interesting one.  For true baseball fans not all of these items are unknowns, and the graphic was obviously created prior to the 2016 season, given the bit of trivia about the Cubs.  The detail about Don Larsen smoking in the dugout during his World Series perfect game was new to me, however, and it appears this tidbit is pretty accurate.

World Series infographic.jpg


Infographic: The Cost of A Season Without Spectators

The infographic below was created by Statista back in March, estimating the potential losses MLB teams would be facing if they were to play an 82-game season in front of no live fans.  For an 82-game season, each team in the league would be facing an average loss of $640,000 per game.  The infographic shows estimated total losses for the top eight teams as a result of the shortened season and spectator-less games.  The total loss for the MLB was estimated to come in around $4 billion.

infographic covid ghost games.jpg

Fast forward to the current arrangement, with a 60-game season, and these dollar amounts are no doubt looking even more ominous than the ones in the graphic.  As much as we all hate that money is such a big part of professional sports, it’s no wonder there was so much of a push to get a season, any season, underway to recoup some of these losses.

However, as I’ve mentioned before, with the coronavirus continuing to spread around the country at such a rapid rate, it’ll be interesting to see if the league even makes it all the way through the planned 60-game schedule.


The 2020 season guide

Major League Baseball just posted this handy quick-reference guide on social media.   While I’m not a huge fan of the runner-on-second rule for extra inning games, I’m pretty excited to see what the universal DH will bring this year.

Further details can be found on this FAQ posted on MLB.com.

2020 MLB guide


Baseball pitches illustrated

Here’s a handy little guide for identifying pitches while watching a ballgame.  I like how each pitch is depicted from two different angles.  Additional descriptive information about each pitch can be found at the graphic creator’s website here.

Baseball pitches illustrated infographic


Infographic: The Cost of Being a Baseball Fan

This infographic by PlayNJ appears to have been made fairly recently — just last month, if I’m not mistaken.  As we all know, attending an MLB game is not a cheap outing, and this graphic takes a look at what that cost amounts to if a fan goes throughout the year.  According to the fine print on the graphic, these annual costs include the price of one team cap and one team jersey, plus ticket, parking, one beer, one soft drink, and one hot dog per game for 81 home games.

Cost of Being a Baseball Fan infographic


What a fastball looks like

This is an interesting illustration that demonstrates the difference between what three different pitches look like as they hurtle towards home plate.  That four-seamer is quite the blur, and it seems you would need quite the discerning eye to distinguish between the two-seamer and the curveball.  Factor in how fast many pitches travel toward the plate, and it goes to show how much batters really need to be prepared for anything.

What a fastball looks like

ESPN the Magazine, 2014


Infographic: MLB Players on Twitter

I’ve had a few previous posts on here about MLB teams and social media, including this infographic about MLB fans on Facebook.  I don’t believe I’ve previously posted anything like this regarding Twitter, however, so I suppose this is that post.

Here’s an infographic from 57hits.com that, instead of looking at the fans, takes a look at the number of Major League ballplayers on Twitter.  The graphic appears to be from 2013, so the data isn’t up-to-date, though I do find it interesting that (at that time, at least) the AL East was far out ahead of the rest of the crowd.

MLB players on Twitter


Infographic: Major League Baseball by the numbers

This infographic is a few years old, created between the 2012 and 2013 seasons from the looks of it.  For example, Fenway Park is now going on 108 years old, and the average MLB salary in 2019 was approximately $4.36 million (according to my Google search).  Still the numbers presented here are interesting to look at.

baseball numbers infographic


Infographic: Major League Home Runs, 1998-2012

I’m not sure what the original intention was behind this graphic by Hartwell.  If the idea was to use it for comparisons, it seems like an awkward way to lay it out.  If does look cool, though, so if that was the whole point, well… mission accomplished.

MLB Home Runs graphic


Infographic: Mariano Rivera

This Tier10 infographic on Mariano Rivera is awesome.  Not only are there a lot of details and statistics about the man himself, you will also find instructions on how to make a cardboard baseball glove.

Click on the image to get to a larger version of the graphic.

exit-sandman--the-life-and-career-of-mariano-rivera infographic