Baseball 101: Batting average

A player’s batting average is determined by dividing the number of base hits a player has by the total number of at-bats.  For example, if a player has 500 at-bats and collects 150 hits in those at-bats, his batting average would be .300 (150/500 = .300).  Keep in mind that walks and sacrifice plays (i.e. sacrifice bunts and sacrifice flies) do not count as at-bats, and therefore, do not factor into a player’s batting average.

A batting average of .300 or above is considered an excellent batting average, and an average of .400 for a season is deemed nearly impossible.  The last player to hit .400 for a season was Ted Williams, who finished the 1941 seasons with a .406 batting average.

ted williams

Wikipedia


One Comment on “Baseball 101: Batting average”

  1. Bill says:

    Hitting .400 for an entire season is an incredibly difficult. Precious, you might be interested in a short Ted Williams article I posted on my website.

    http://fieldofdreamsiowa.com/big-city-legend-small-town-hero

    I’m enjoying your blog posts. 🙂


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